Psychoeducational intervention changes patient attitudes on clinical trials participation

June 13, 2012

Seeking ways to change cancer patients' perceptions and negative attitudes towards clinical trials participation, researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center conducted a study offering two different kinds of intervention to two groups of adults with cancer who had not previously been asked to participate in clinical trials. They found a multimedia psychoeducational intervention to be more effective in changing patients' perceptions and negative attitudes toward clinical trials than standard educational literature.

The study was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"Clinical trials are critical to the development of more effective cancer treatments," said study lead author Paul B. Jacobsen, Ph.D., senior member at Moffitt and associate center director for Population Science. "However, clinical trials are hampered by low rates of patient participation."

According to Jacobsen and colleagues, the low rates of patient participation point to the need to develop interventions that will increase the likelihood of patients enrolling in clinical trials. Many interventions used in the past, they noted, focused on improving the consenting process rather than changing about clinical trials.

"Research has consistently revealed that patients have and attitudes about clinical trials," explained Jacobsen. "We hypothesized that the right intervention would have a positive impact in changing perceptions and attitudes towards participation."

For this study, 472 who had not previously been asked to participate in a clinical trial were divided into two groups: one group viewed a new, 18-minute multimedia psychoeducational presentation, and the second group received existing printed about clinical trials.

"Our results demonstrated the benefits of providing patients with a brief, multimedia psychoeducational program focused on changing attitudes towards clinical trials," wrote the researchers. "The group receiving the multimedia psychoeducational intervention developed a more positive attitude and demonstrated an increased willingness to enroll in a clinical trial when compared with the group receiving printed educational material."

"Although the effects were modest, the successful intervention has the potential to reach a large number of patients and, thus, have broad impact," wrote the researchers. "The psychoeducational multimedia presentation requires relatively little time, effort and resources to deliver."

Explore further: Researchers: Quality of life as important as quantity of life

Related Stories

Researchers: Quality of life as important as quantity of life

April 27, 2012
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have placed new emphasis on gathering data on cancer patient quality of life during both treatment and survivorship. Their focus is on gathering and using that data to develop interventions ...

Lower income cancer patients less likely to be involved in clinical trials

June 3, 2012
Cancer patients with annual household incomes below $50,000 were less likely to participate in clinical trials than patients with annual incomes of $50,000 or higher, and were more likely to be concerned about how to pay ...

Penn-developed online informed consent tool could boost number of patients in cancer clinical trials

October 3, 2011
A new multimedia informed consent tool accessed via the Internet may make it easier for cancer patients to understand and feel comfortable enrolling in clinical trials, according a study conducted by researchers in the Perelman ...

New Moffitt Cancer Center patent promises to accelerate cancer trials

February 14, 2012
A new patent has been issued to Moffitt Cancer Center for a computerized system that efficiently selects the right patient for the right clinical trial. The newly patented system matches the registered patient's own molecular ...

Several cancers underrepresented in clinical trials

April 18, 2011
(PhysOrg.com) -- Several cancers with a high burden of disease are not receiving the clinical trial investment they require, according to a University of Sydney study.

Recommended for you

Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers

July 20, 2017
Virtually all cancer treatments used today also damage normal cells, causing the toxic side effects associated with cancer treatment. A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center ...

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes

July 20, 2017
Several known factors are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer including increasing age, being overweight after menopause, alcohol intake, and family history. However, the underlying biologic mechanisms through ...

Immune-cell numbers predict response to combination immunotherapy in melanoma

July 20, 2017
Whether a melanoma patient will better respond to a single immunotherapy drug or two in combination depends on the abundance of certain white blood cells within their tumors, according to a new study conducted by UC San Francisco ...

Discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

July 19, 2017
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which ...

Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumors

July 19, 2017
The most comprehensive analysis yet of medulloblastoma has identified genomic changes responsible for more than 75 percent of the brain tumors, including two new suspected cancer genes that were found exclusively in the least ...

Novel CRISPR-Cas9 screening enables discovery of new targets to aid cancer immunotherapy

July 19, 2017
A novel screening method developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center—using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice—has ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.