Racial difference in effect of physical activity on obesity

June 6, 2012
Racial difference in effect of physical activity on obesity

(HealthDay) -- Black adolescent girls are less sensitive to the effects of physical activity in preventing obesity than are white girls, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

James White, Ph.D., from Cardiff University, and Russell Jago, Ph.D., from the University of Bristol -- both in the United Kingdom, analyzed data from 1,148 who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study at ages 12 and 14 years. Accelerometer counts per day were used to assess . was defined according to three measures: ≥95th percentile of body mass index; using the International Obesity Task Force reference body mass index cut points; and the sums of skinfold thickness method (with obesity ≥90th percentile in the cohort).

The researchers found that, in white girls, but not black girls, there was a strong negative dose-response association between quartiles of accelerometer counts per day at age 12 years and obesity at age 14 years (using all three measurements of obesity). There was a significant increased likelihood of obesity (based on skinfold thickness) between the highest and the lowest quartiles of accelerometer counts per day in white girls (odds ratio, 0.15; P = 0.03 for trend) but not in black girls (odds ratio, 0.85; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.32 to 2.26; P = 0.93 for trend).

"Higher levels of physical activity are prospectively associated with lower levels of obesity in white adolescent girls but not in black adolescent girls," the authors write.

Explore further: Obesity prevention program for girls not associated with significant difference in body mass index

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Obesity prevention program for girls not associated with significant difference in body mass index

May 7, 2012
An Australian school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent girls was not associated with statistically significant differences in body mass index (BMI) and other body composition measures, however the small changes ...

Improving body satisfaction can help prevent eating disorders and obesity

May 11, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- In a study that examined the relationship between body dissatisfaction, body mass index (BMI) and binge eating in overweight and obese adolescent girls, Kendrin R. Sonneville, ScD, RD, researcher ...

Study finds higher adherence to dash-style diet reduces excess weight gain in adolescent girls

June 6, 2011
Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers found that girls who followed the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet pattern had a lower incidence of excess weight gain as measured by body mass index ...

Recommended for you

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized

November 17, 2017
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types ...

Reversing negative effects of maternal obesity

November 8, 2017
A drug that increases energy metabolism may lead to a new approach to prevent obesity in children born to overweight mothers, UNSW Sydney researchers have found.

Serving water with school lunches could prevent child, adult obesity: study

November 7, 2017
Encouraging children to drink plain water with their school lunches could prevent more than half a million youths in the U.S. from becoming overweight or obese, and trim the medical costs and indirect societal costs associated ...

Why do some obese people have 'healthier' fat tissue than others?

November 1, 2017
One little understood paradox in the study of obesity is that overweight people who break down fat at a high rate are less healthy than peers who store their fat more effectively.

Engineered protein treatment found to reduce obesity in mice, rats and primates

October 19, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with pharmaceutical company Amgen Inc. report that an engineered version of a protein naturally found in the body caused test mice, rats and cynomolgus monkeys to lose weight. In their ...

Nearly 4 in 10 U.S. adults now obese (Update)

October 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Almost forty percent adults in the United States are now obese, continuing an ever-expanding epidemic of obesity that's expected to lead to sicker Americans and higher health care costs.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.