Tumor-Infiltrating lymphocyte grade IDs melanoma survival

June 20, 2012
Tumor-Infiltrating lymphocyte grade IDs melanoma survival
Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte grade is an independent predictor of melanoma-specific survival and sentinel lymph node status in patients with localized primary cutaneous melanoma, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay) -- Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) grade is an independent predictor of melanoma-specific survival and sentinel lymph node (SLN) status in patients with localized primary cutaneous melanoma, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

To investigate whether the density and distribution of TILs independently predicts SLN status and survival, Farhad Azimi, of the Melanoma Institute Australia in Sydney, and colleagues reviewed data from 1,865 patients with a single localized primary cutaneous melanoma ≥0.75 mm in thickness.

The researchers observed an inverse association between TIL grade and tumor thickness, mitotic rate, and Clark level. Sixty-one percent of patients underwent a SLN biopsy and 22.1 percent were positive. SLN positivity decreased with increasing TIL grade, ranging from 27.8 percent for TIL grade 0 to 5.6 percent for TIL grade 3 (P < 0.001). Decreasing age, decreasing TIL grade, ulceration, increasing tumor thickness, satellitosis, and increasing mitoses were significant predictors of SLN positivity. Independent predictors of melanoma-specific survival were tumor thickness, ulceration, satellitosis, mitotic rate, TIL grade, and sex. Survival was 100 percent in those with TIL grade 3.

"Ultimately, a greater understanding of the mechanisms controlling TILs in melanoma may provide avenues for developing important new immunotherapeutic strategies for patients with ," the authors write.

Explore further: Women have clear melanoma survival advantage over men

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Women have clear melanoma survival advantage over men

May 1, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Women with localized melanoma have a consistent advantage over men of approximately 30 percent for survival and progression, according to a study published online April 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

ASCO: Dabrafenib/Trametinib active in metastatic melanoma

May 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with V600 BRAF-mutant solid tumors, treatment with the oral BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib and the oral MEK 1/2 inhibitor trametinib is tolerated and has clinical activity in BRAF inhibitor-naive metastatic ...

Ipilimumab active in advanced melanoma with brain mets

March 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For some patients with advanced melanoma and brain metastases, ipilimumab is active, according to the results of a phase 2 study published online March 27 in The Lancet Oncology.

Invasive melanoma may be more likely in children than adults

October 5, 2011
A Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of young people with melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, has found that some children have a higher risk of invasive disease than adults.

Sentinel node biopsy safe, effective in head and neck melanomas

August 5, 2011
A common technique for determining whether melanoma has spread can be used safely and effectively even in tumors from the head and neck area, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

New study reveals breast cancer cells recycle their own ammonia waste as fuel

October 19, 2017
Breast cancer cells recycle ammonia, a waste byproduct of cell metabolism, and use it as a source of nitrogen to fuel tumor growth, report scientists from Harvard Medical School in the journal Science.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.