Anxiety, depression common in adults with arthritis

July 9, 2012
Anxiety, depression common in adults with arthritis
Anxiety and depression are both common among U.S. adults with arthritis, with anxiety found more often than depression, according to a study published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

(HealthDay) -- Anxiety and depression are both common among U.S. adults with arthritis, with anxiety found more often than depression, according to a study published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

To estimate the prevalence and correlates of among adults with doctor-diagnosed , Louise B. Murphy, Ph.D., of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues utilized a sample of data from the Arthritis Conditions Health Effects Survey involving 1,793 U.S. aged 45 years or older. Separate and validated subscales of the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales were used to assess anxiety and depression.

The researchers found that anxiety and depression were reported in 31 and 18 percent of respondents, respectively, with one-third, overall, reporting at least one of the conditions. Eighty-four percent of those with depression had concomitant anxiety. A distinct profile of characteristics could not be identified for those with anxiety and/or depression. For those with anxiety and/or depression, only half sought medical help from their health care provider (HCP).

"We found that both anxiety and depression are common among people with arthritis, and the prevalence of anxiety was higher than the prevalence of depression," the authors write. "Approximately half of the affected respondents whose arthritis was being treated by an HCP had not sought treatment in the past year for their mental health condition, indicating a missed opportunity for HCP intervention."

Explore further: One-third of adult Americans with arthritis battle anxiety or depression

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kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (1) Jul 13, 2012
In my opinion, the arthritis is mostly caused by reactions to food. This also leads to depletion of vitamin C since thebody is using up that resource in "fighting" off supposed invaders. Lack of vitamin C [and omega 3] causes poor sleep which in turn leads to anxiety and depression. The best way forward would be to assess the person's IgG reaction to different foods and eliminate those that are most reactive in a controlled fashion.

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