Using exhaust fan on a gas stove cuts pollution: study

July 26, 2012
Using exhaust fan on a gas stove cuts pollution: study
Researchers also found cooking on back burners was better for air quality.

(HealthDay) -- Turning on the exhaust fan above your kitchen stove and cooking on the back burners can reduce the amount of air pollution from gas stovetops and ovens, a new study says.

The study also found, however, that exhaust fans vary in their effectiveness in reducing levels of from cooking with gas, which can produce higher than those in heavily polluted outdoor air.

Exhaust fans in hoods over cooktops and downdraft systems that suck air directly from the cooking surface also vary widely in price, loudness and , concluded researchers Brett Singer and William Delp at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of in Berkeley, Calif.

Despite these differences, there is no rating system to help consumers know which product is best at removing pollutants from their home.

The study was recently published in the journal & Technology.

The researchers measured the performance of seven over-the-range hood designs and found that none of them performed well in all of the key functions: fan efficiency, sound levels and efficiency in capturing polluted air for exhaust, according to a journal news release.

Two products that operated quietly and removed 70 percent to 90 percent of pollutants had high fan speeds that compromised their efficiency. A third product that was best at removing pollutants was so loud it made normal conversation impossible.

The best option may not require buying a new over-the-range hood, the researchers suggested.

"Routine use of even moderately effective venting range hoods can substantially reduce in-home exposures to cooking and burner-generated air pollutants," Singer and Delp wrote. "Effectiveness can be substantially enhanced by preferential use of back versus front cooktop burners and by using higher fan settings."

Explore further: Kitchen exhaust fans vary in effectiveness in reducing indoor air pollution

More information: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about air quality inside homes.

Related Stories

Kitchen exhaust fans vary in effectiveness in reducing indoor air pollution

May 31, 2012
(Phys.org) -- Cooking exhaust hoods designed for home kitchens vary widely in their ability to capture and vent away the air pollutants generated by the gas burners on cook stoves, according to a study by two Lawrence Berkeley ...

Recommended for you

One in 4 women and 1 in 6 men aged 65+ will be physically disabled in Europe by 2047

October 23, 2017
By 2047 one in four women and one in six men aged 65 and above is expected to be living with a physical disability that will severely restrict everyday activities, reveals an analysis published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Protein regulates vitamin A metabolic pathways, prevents inflammation

October 23, 2017
A team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how uncontrolled vitamin A metabolism in the gut can cause harmful inflammation. The discovery links diet to inflammatory diseases, ...

New insights into controversial diagnosis of adolescent chronic fatigue

October 23, 2017
Crucial new research could provide some clarity around the controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in adolescents. The research by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute published ...

Do boys really have a testosterone spurt at age four?

October 23, 2017
The idea that four-year-old boys have a spurt of testosterone is often used to explain challenging behaviour at this age.

Our laws don't do enough to protect our health data

October 23, 2017
Have you ever wondered why your computer often shows you ads that seem tailor-made for your interests? The answer is big data. By combing through extremely large datasets, analysts can reveal patterns in your behavior.

New prevention exercise programme to reduce rugby injuries

October 23, 2017
A new dynamic 20-minute exercise programme, performed by rugby players before training and pre-match, could dramatically reduce injuries in the sport according to a benchmark study published today (Sunday 22 October).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.