Pertussis reaches epidemic level in Washington state

July 20, 2012
Pertussis reaches epidemic level in washington state
Pertussis rates may reach record levels this year in the United States, where Washington state is experiencing an ongoing epidemic, according to a report published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

(HealthDay) -- Pertussis rates may reach record levels this year in the United States, where Washington state is experiencing an ongoing epidemic, according to a report published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Chas DeBolt, M.P.H., of the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues reviewed all cases reported between Jan. 1 and June 16 of this year to assess clinical, epidemiologic, and laboratory factors associated with the rise in pertussis cases in the state of Washington. This rise prompted the state's Secretary of Health to declare an in April.

The researchers found that 2,520 pertussis cases were reported in the first six months of 2012, a 1,300 percent increase over the first six months of 2011. Disease rates were high in infants and children under the age of 10, but also in 13- to 14-year-old adolescents who had received the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, which suggests immunity might wane soon after Tdap vaccination.

"The focus of prevention and control efforts is the protection of infants and others at greatest risk for severe disease and improving vaccination coverage in adolescents and adults, especially those who are pregnant," DeBolt and colleagues conclude. "Pertussis vaccination remains the single most effective strategy for prevention of infection."

Explore further: What did we learn from the 2010 California whooping cough epidemic?

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Temple
3 / 5 (2) Jul 20, 2012
I swear, if the cure for cancer were to involve a vaccine, humans will still be getting cancer for centuries.
ROBTHEGOB
1.6 / 5 (5) Jul 21, 2012
There is a direct relation of the rise in pertussis with the influx of illegal aliens from Mexico. They have filthy habits, and often have never been vaccinated.
alfie_null
3 / 5 (2) Jul 21, 2012
There is a direct relation of the rise in pertussis with the influx of illegal aliens from Mexico. They have filthy habits, and often have never been vaccinated.

What a bizarre assertion! Because they are illegal aliens, or because they are Mexicans?

I'd guess to the contrary (regarding filthiness of illegal aliens), actually. For reasons you wouldn't understand.
Doug_Huffman
2 / 5 (4) Jul 21, 2012
ROB's opinion was clumsily expressed but not far from the mark. Quite a number of afflictions are *correlated* with the influx of often depauperate xenocultures and with first world cultures extreme efforts to accommodate them. Bedbugs in inexpensive commercial lodgings come instantly to mind. Lack of vaccinations are an essential aspect - not least of ignorance.
Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (2) Jul 21, 2012
I'd guess to the contrary actually. For reasons you wouldn't understand.
Null well demonstrates the logical relation between ad homina and argumentum ad verecundiam, that opponent is personally unfit for actor's special knowledge.

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