Physical illness hospitalization found to increase suicide risk

July 16, 2012
Physical illness hospitalization found to increase suicide risk
Hospitalization for physical illness more than doubles the risk of suicide, with approximately one-quarter of suicides attributable to physical illness, according to research published online July 9 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay) -- Hospitalization for physical illness more than doubles the risk of suicide, with approximately one-quarter of suicides attributable to physical illness, according to research published online July 9 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Ping Qin, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Aarhus in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a nested case-control study using data from 27,262 suicide cases in Denmark and 468,007 matched control subjects to evaluate whether suicide risk is associated with hospitalization for illnesses or specific illness or comorbidities.

The researchers found that hospitalization for physical illness was reported in 63.5 percent of suicide cases, compared with 44.5 percent of comparison controls. Physical illness was associated with a more than doubling of the risk of subsequent suicide, particularly in women. The risk of suicide was higher for those who had been hospitalized more frequently and/or recently and for those with more than one involved organ or system. Overall, physical illness accounted for 24.4, 21.0, and 32.3 percent of the population-attributable in the total, male, and female populations, respectively.

"The results from this population study indicate the need to integrate within hospital treatment as well as within general medical practice," the authors write. "Patients hospitalized for physical illness not only form a well-defined at high risk of suicide, but also maintain frequent contact with their general practitioner after hospital discharge. This provides opportunities for both risk assessment and prevention."

Explore further: Psychiatric units safer as in-patient suicide falls

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Psychiatric units safer as in-patient suicide falls

May 16, 2012
Suicides by psychiatric in-patients have fallen to a new low, research published today has found.

Suicide risk for older people who self-harm

May 2, 2012
Older people who self-harm are at much greater risk of suicide than both the general population and younger adults who self-harm, a new study has found. Researchers from The University of Manchester studied 1,177 people over ...

Recommended for you

Oxytocin turns up the volume of your social environment

September 20, 2017
Before you shop for the "cuddle" hormone oxytocin to relieve stress and enhance your social life, read this: a new study from the University of California, Davis, suggests that sometimes, blocking the action of oxytocin in ...

Researchers develop new tool to assess individual's level of wisdom

September 20, 2017
Researchers at University of San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new tool called the San Diego Wisdom Scale (SD-WISE) to assess an individual's level of wisdom, based upon a conceptualization of wisdom as a trait ...

Self-control may not diminish throughout the day

September 20, 2017
After a long day of work and carefully watching what you eat, you might expect your self-control to slip a little by kicking back and cracking open a bag of potato chips.

Alcohol use affects levels of cholesterol regulator through epigenetics

September 20, 2017
In an analysis of the epigenomes of people and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Institutes of Health report that drinking alcohol may induce changes to a cholesterol-regulating gene.

One in four girls is depressed at age 14, new study reveals

September 20, 2017
New research shows a quarter of girls (24%) and one in 10 boys (9%) are depressed at age 14.

Tablets can teach kids to solve physical puzzles

September 20, 2017
Researchers confirm that when 4-6 year old children learn how to solve a puzzle using a touchscreen tablet, they can then apply this learning to the same puzzle in the physical world. This contradicts most previous research ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.