Three single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with aortic stenosis involving tricuspid aortic valves in older patients, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

(HealthDay) -- Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with aortic stenosis involving tricuspid aortic valves in older patients, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Stephen G. Ellis, M.D., from the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues genotyped 265 patients (aged 73 ± 7 years; 72.7 percent male) with aortic stenosis involving tricuspid and 961 controls (69 ± 6 years; 69.8 percent male) for up to 660 candidate . The correlation between age-adjusted aortic valve area, as determined by echocardiography or cardiac catheterization, and SNPs was assessed, with a bootstrapped global P value of ≤0.005 indicative of a possible significant correlation.

The researchers found that minor allele frequency was 21 percent ± 15 percent. The criteria for a significant correlation were met by three SNPs (rs2276288 [MYO7A], P = 0.001; rs5194 [AGTR1], P = 0.004; rs207 307 [ELN], P = 0.005). Two additional SNPs achieved borderline significance (P ≤0.008).

"In conclusion, we report three SNPs to be associated with aortic stenosis involving tricuspid aortic valves in older subjects," the authors write. "Given the concerns regarding the problem of multiple statistical testing, validation studies are required to further assess these correlations."