Turmeric component reduces type 2 diabetes incidence

July 12, 2012

Turmeric component reduces type 2 diabetes incidence
A component of turmeric -- curcumin -- reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes and improves β-cell function in adults with prediabetes, according to a study published online July 6 in Diabetes Care.
(HealthDay) -- A component of turmeric -- curcumin -- reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes and improves β-cell function in adults with prediabetes, according to a study published online July 6 in Diabetes Care.

Somlak Chuengsamarn, M.D., from Srinakharinwirot University in Nakornnayok, Thailand, and colleagues randomly assigned 240 adults with prediabetes to receive oral curcumin or placebo twice a day for nine months. Type 2 progression was assessed following treatment.

After nine months the researchers found that 16.4 percent of the placebo group and none of the curcumin group were diagnosed with 2 diabetes mellitus. Curcumin treatment was associated with significantly improved β-cell function, with higher homeostasis model assessment-β and lower C-peptide levels. Compared with the placebo group, curcumin treatment was also associated with lower homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and higher adiponectin.

"A nine-month curcumin intervention of a prediabetes population significantly lowered the number of prediabetic individuals who eventually developed mellitus," Chuengsamarn and colleagues conclude. "In addition, the curcumin treatment appeared to improve overall function of β-cells, with very minor adverse effects."

The Thai Government Pharmaceutical Organization provided the extract and placebo for the study.

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