UVC light kills wound bacteria

July 23, 2012

Ultraviolet (UVC) light can eradicate wound-infecting bacteria on mice increasing both survival and healing rates, according to a paper in the July 2012 issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. The light did not damage the animals' skin or delay wound healing, says principal investigator Michael R. Hamblin, of the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

range from the superficial, to the life threatening, which are rare except among . However, "…these infections are becoming worrisome due to bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics," the researchers write.

Unlike with antibiotics, bacteria probably cannot develop complete resistance to UVC light, "although it is possible that variants with enhanced DNA repair systems may emerge," the investigators note, adding that only four times more radiation would be needed to decimate Deinococcus radiodurans, a species that is famous for its radiation resistance, than in the case of E. coli.

In the study, the investigators infected the mice with bioluminescent strains of gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, the former "noted for its invasive properties in mouse wound models," according to the report. The dimming of the bioluminescence—down to near zero—indicated the fate of the infective bacteria. The mice were exposed to UVC light 30 minutes after inoculation.

For both bacteria UVC treatment reduced bacterial contamination of wounds by 10-fold compared to untreated mice. In addition, treatment increased the survival rate of mice infected with P. aeruginosa and the rate in mice infected with S. aureus.

"These results suggested that UVC light may be used for the prophylaxis of cutaneous wound infections," write the researchers.

Explore further: Honey can reverse antibiotic resistance

More information: T. Dai, B. Garcia, C.K. Murray, M.S. Vrahas, and M.R. Hamblin, 2012. UVC light prophylaxis for cutaneous wound infections in mice. Antim. Agents Chemother. 56:3841-3848.

Related Stories

Honey can reverse antibiotic resistance

April 13, 2011
Manuka honey could be an efficient way to clear chronically infected wounds and could even help reverse bacterial resistance to antibiotics, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring ...

Long-term use of antibiotic to treat acne not associated with increased bacterial resistance

April 11, 2011
The prolonged use of tetracycline antibiotics commonly used to treat acne was associated with a reduced prevalence of StaphylococcuS. aureus bacteria and was not associated with increased resistance to the tetracycline antibiotics, ...

Recommended for you

Engineered protein treatment found to reduce obesity in mice, rats and primates

October 19, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with pharmaceutical company Amgen Inc. report that an engineered version of a protein naturally found in the body caused test mice, rats and cynomolgus monkeys to lose weight. In their ...

New procedure enables cultivation of human brain sections in the petri dish

October 19, 2017
Researchers at the University of Tübingen have become the first to keep human brain tissue alive outside the body for several weeks. The researchers, headed by Dr. Niklas Schwarz, Dr. Henner Koch and Dr. Thomas Wuttke at ...

Cancer drug found to offer promising results in treating sepsis in test mice

October 19, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A combined team of researchers from China and the U.S. has found that a drug commonly used to treat lung cancer in humans offers a degree of protection against sepsis in test mice. In their paper published ...

Tracing cell death pathway points to drug targets for brain damage, kidney injury, asthma

October 19, 2017
University of Pittsburgh scientists are unlocking the complexities of a recently discovered cell death process that plays a key role in health and disease, and new findings link their discovery to asthma, kidney injury and ...

Study reveals key molecular link in major cell growth pathway

October 19, 2017
A team of scientists led by Whitehead Institute has uncovered a surprising molecular link that connects how cells regulate growth with how they sense and make available the nutrients required for growth. Their work, which ...

Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster

October 18, 2017
Scars may fade, but the skin remembers. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals that wounds or other harmful, inflammation-provoking experiences impart long-lasting memories to stem cells residing in the skin, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.