Bristol-Myers recalls vials of cancer drug

August 30, 2012

(AP)—Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. is recalling more than 31,000 units of a chemotherapy drug after discovering one vial was overfilled, putting patients at risk of an overdose.

The company's action affects 10 lots of BiCNU, an injection of the drug carmustine, used to treat , multiple myeloma, Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Bristol-Myers said taking too much of the drug could result in lung or kidney toxicity, though no adverse events have been reported yet.

The drug was manufactured by Ben Venue Laboratories, a former manufacturing contractor for the New York drugmaker. The recall affects products sold in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Latin America and Asia.

Bristol-Myers said the recall is unlikely to result in a product shortage.

and customers can get more information by calling 1-888-896-4564.

Explore further: Bristol-Myers to buy diabetes drug maker for $5B

shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers identify source of opioids' side effects

January 17, 2017

A commercially available drug may help drastically reduce two side effects of opioid painkillers—a growing tolerance and a paradoxical increased sensitivity to pain—without affecting the drugs' ability to reduce pain, ...

CVS generic competitor to EpiPen, sold at a 6th the price

January 12, 2017

CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan's EpiPen at about a sixth of its price, just months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to ...

Many misuse OTC sleep aids: survey

December 29, 2016

(HealthDay)—People struggling with insomnia often turn to non-prescription sleep remedies that may be habit-forming and are only intended for short-term use, according to a new Consumer Reports survey.

The pill won't kill your sexual desire, researchers say

December 15, 2016

Taking the pill doesn't lower your sexual desire, contrary to popular belief, according to research published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. The authors of the research, from the University of Kentucky and Indiana University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.