Post-polyp detection, CRC risk ID'd by colonoscopy factors

August 21, 2012
Post-polyp detection, CRC risk ID'd by colonoscopy factors
In the community setting, after colonoscopic polyp detection, colonoscopy-related factors such as incomplete polyp removal and lack of surveillance colonoscopies are more important than polyp characteristics in predicting subsequent colorectal cancer risk, according to a study published in the Aug. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay) -- In the community setting, after colonoscopic polyp detection, colonoscopy-related factors such as incomplete polyp removal and lack of surveillance colonoscopies are more important than polyp characteristics in predicting subsequent colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, according to a study published in the Aug. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

To examine the role of -related factors and polyp characteristics on the risk for CRC after detection of colonoscopic polyps, Hermann Brenner, M.D., M.P.H., of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues used data from a previously published population-based, case-control study involving 3,148 case participants with CRC and 3,274 control patients.

The researchers identified 155 case participants and 260 with physician-validated polyp detection in the preceding 10 years. Among cases, characteristics that were significantly more common included: incomplete removal of all polyps (odds ratio [OR], 3.73); no surveillance colonoscopy within five years (OR, 2.96); and detection of three or more polyps (OR, 2.21). Overall, nearly twice as many CRC cases were due to colonoscopy-related rather than polyp-related characteristics (41.1 versus 21.7 percent).

"We found colonoscopy-related factors (in particular, lack of complete removal of all polyps and lack of surveillance colonoscopy within five years) to be more important predictors of CRC occurrence after colonoscopic detection of polyps (other than hyperplastic polyps) than polyp characteristics," the authors conclude.

Explore further: Study supports longer scope intervals post-polypectomy

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study supports longer scope intervals post-polypectomy

July 24, 2012
(HealthDay) -- People who have had a colonoscopy during which a high-risk potentially cancerous polyp was removed may not need another colonoscopy for five years, German researchers report.

Colonoscopy screening markedly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and death

July 24, 2012
A study from researchers in Switzerland found that colonoscopy with polypectomy significantly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer-related death in the general population. A total of 12 colorectal cancer ...

Physicians who play Mozart while performing colonoscopy may improve adenoma detection rate

October 31, 2011
Physicians who listen to Mozart while performing colonoscopy may increase their detection rates of precancerous polyps, according to the results of a new study unveiled today at the American College of Gastroenterology's ...

Recommended for you

Drug yields high response rates for lung cancer patients with harsh mutation

October 18, 2017
A targeted therapy resurrected by the Moon Shots Program at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has produced unprecedented response rates among patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that carries ...

Possible new immune therapy target in lung cancer

October 18, 2017
A study from Bern University Hospital in collaboration with the University of Bern shows that so-called perivascular-like cells from lung tumors behave abnormally. They not only inadequately support vascular structures, but ...

Many pelvic tumors in women may have common origin—fallopian tubes

October 17, 2017
Most—and possibly all—ovarian cancers start, not in ovaries, but instead in the fallopian tubes attached to them.

Researchers find novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugs

October 17, 2017
The targeted anti-cancer therapies cetuximab and panitumumab are mainstays of treatment for advanced colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. However, many patients have tumors ...

New bowel cancer drug target discovered

October 17, 2017
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a new drug target for bowel cancer that is specific to tumour cells and therefore less toxic than conventional therapies.

Using artificial intelligence to improve early breast cancer detection

October 17, 2017
Every year 40,000 women die from breast cancer in the U.S. alone. When cancers are found early, they can often be cured. Mammograms are the best test available, but they're still imperfect and often result in false positive ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.