Rat study shows chrysotile asbestos is strong carcinogen

August 14, 2012
Rat study shows chrysotile asbestos is strong carcinogen
Chrysotile, a commercially used type of asbestos, induces malignant mesothelioma in the rat peritoneal cavity, with pathogenesis strongly linked to iron overload, according to a study published online Aug. 2 in The Journal of Pathology.

(HealthDay) -- Chrysotile, a commercially used type of asbestos, induces malignant mesothelioma (MM) in the rat peritoneal cavity, with pathogenesis strongly linked to iron overload, according to a study published online Aug. 2 in The Journal of Pathology.

To examine the carcinogenicity of chrysotile, Li Jiang, from the Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan, and colleagues injected rats with a suspension of standard asbestos in saline. Some of the asbestos-treated rats were injected with 80 mg/kg nitrilotriacetate (NTA) to enhance an iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction. Rat samples were analyzed for histological and immunohistochemical characteristics.

The researchers found that the pathogenesis of chrysotile-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis correlated closely with iron overload. The period required for carcinogenesis was significantly reduced with repeated administration of the iron chelator NTA. Peritoneal organs were found to have massive iron deposition. The most frequent genomic alteration in human MM and in iron-induced rodent carcinogenesis -- homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/2B/ARF -- was observed in 92.6 percent of the cases studied with array-based comparative genomic hybridization. There was high expression of mesoderm specific transcription factors Dlx5 and Hand1 in induced rat MM cells, which demonstrated active iron uptake and utilization.

"In conclusion, chrysotile is a strong carcinogen that acts through the induction of local iron overload in vivo when it [reaches] mesothelial cells," the authors write. "Therefore, more appropriate measures have to be taken to reduce environmental cancer risk in this era of ."

Explore further: Expert: Cancer rates show it's time for a global asbestos ban

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Expert: Cancer rates show it's time for a global asbestos ban

August 19, 2011
The use of asbestos building materials in developing countries results in millions of preventable cancer cases, a University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health epidemiologist reports in the coming issue of ...

Myelodysplastic syndrome treated with deferasirox shows beneficial iron reduction

June 22, 2012
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues at six other institutions have recently tested a treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, a blood-related malignancy that involves the ineffective production ...

Recommended for you

Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments

November 17, 2017
In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels.

Age and gut bacteria contribute to multiple sclerosis disease progression

November 17, 2017
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School published a study suggesting that gut bacteria at young age can contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) disease onset and progression.

Molecular guardian defends cells, organs against excess cholesterol

November 16, 2017
A team of researchers at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health has illuminated a critical player in cholesterol metabolism that acts as a molecular guardian in cells to help maintain cholesterol levels within a safe, ...

Prototype ear plug sensor could improve monitoring of vital signs

November 16, 2017
Scientists have developed a sensor that fits in the ear, with the aim of monitoring the heart, brain and lungs functions for health and fitness.

Ancient enzyme could boost power of liquid biopsies to detect and profile cancers

November 16, 2017
Scientists are developing a set of medical tests called liquid biopsies that can rapidly detect the presence of cancers, infectious diseases and other conditions from only a small blood sample. Researchers at The University ...

FDA to crack down on risky stem cell offerings

November 16, 2017
U.S. health authorities announced plans Thursday to crack down on doctors pushing stem cell procedures that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that previously has received ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.