'Surgeon-tailored' mesh repair resolves urinary incontinence

August 9, 2012
'Surgeon-tailored' mesh repair resolves urinary incontinence
"Surgeon-tailored" polypropylene mesh repair using a transobturator midurethral sling procedure alone or in combination with pelvic organ prolapse repair is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence symptoms, although some concerns remain regarding mesh-related complications, according to a study published in the August issue of Urology.

(HealthDay) -- "Surgeon-tailored" polypropylene mesh (STPM) repair using a transobturator midurethral sling procedure alone or in combination with pelvic organ prolapse repair is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence symptoms, although some concerns remain regarding mesh-related complications, according to a study published in the August issue of Urology.

Fikret Fatih Önol, M.D., of the Ümraniye Training and Research Hospital in Istanbul, and colleagues conducted a study involving 52 women with stress urinary incontinence and pelvic who were treated with transobturator midurethral sling alone, and 74 women who received concomitant pelvic organ prolapse repair. One-hundred eighteen women were available for follow-up.

During follow-up the researchers found that 86.4 and 81.1 percent of sling-treated and sling plus pelvic organ prolapse repair patients, respectively, were cured of their stress urinary incontinence. Nearly all (98.6 percent) patients were cured of their pelvic organ prolapse. Preoperative urge symptoms resolved for 53.8 and 62.5 percent of sling and sling plus pelvic organ prolapse repair patients, respectively; however, new urge symptoms developed in 22 and 15 percent, respectively. In 11 patients (14.8 percent) who underwent concomitant pelvic organ prolapse repair vaginal mesh erosions were observed.

"STPM may represent a cost-effective option for stress treatment. Concomitant pelvic organ prolapse repair with STPM does not affect incontinence outcomes and provides high anatomic success and patient satisfaction in the long term," the authors write. "An improved understanding of the risk factors for mesh erosion, development of more bio-compatible implant materials, and better definition of patient selection criteria will define the role of transvaginal surgery for prolapse management in the future."

Explore further: Findings provide guide to decisions on use of slings for women's prolapse surgery

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Findings provide guide to decisions on use of slings for women's prolapse surgery

June 20, 2012
A multicenter study involving a UT Southwestern Medical Center urogynecologist will eliminate some of the guesswork physicians face about whether to use a sling during vaginal prolapse repair to prevent urinary incontinence.

PISQ-12 validated for patients with pelvic organ prolapse

March 3, 2012
(HealthDay) -- The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) has been shown to be a valid measure of sexual function in patients who undergo surgical mesh implantation for treatment of pelvic ...

Researchers offer hope to prolapse sufferers

May 17, 2011
Scientists in Scandinavia have found a new way to treat sufferers of pelvic organ prolapse. Presented in the New England Journal of Medicine, their study reveals that the use of synthetic mesh can have a more beneficial effect ...

Transvaginal mesh op restores pelvic organ prolapse at price

May 26, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Transvaginal mesh (TVM) procedures are effective for anatomical restoration of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), but patients report a worsening of sexual function following surgery, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Pair of discoveries illuminate new paths to flu and anthrax treatments

October 17, 2017
Two recent studies led by biologists at the University of California San Diego have set the research groundwork for new avenues to treat influenza and anthrax poisoning.

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis

October 17, 2017
An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Health-care ...

New tools to combat kidney fibrosis

October 16, 2017
Interstitial fibrosis – excessive tissue scarring – contributes to chronic kidney disease, which is increasing in prevalence in the United States.

How hepatitis C hides in the body

October 13, 2017
The Hepatitis C (HCV) virus is a sly enemy to have in one's body. Not only does it manage to make itself invisible to the immune system by breaking down communication between the immune cells, it also builds secret virus ...

Largest study yet of malaria in Africa shows historical rates of infection

October 12, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with members from the Kenya Medical Research Institute, the University of Oxford and the University of KwaZulu-Natal has conducted the largest-ever study of the history of malaria ...

Promising new target for treatment of psoriasis is safe, study shows

October 11, 2017
A protein known to play a significant role in the development of psoriasis can be prevented from functioning without posing a risk to patients, scientists at King's College London have found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.