Bariatric surgery substantially reduces the risk of diabetes

September 18, 2012, University of Gothenburg

Bariatric surgery reduces the long-term risk of developing diabetes by over 80 % among people with obesity. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published the results of a study conducted at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

A study conducted by Professor Lars Sjöström, Professor Lena Carlsson and their team at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, has found that bariatric surgery is considerably more effective than traditional care and in preventing diabetes among people with obesity.

The treatment group consisted of 1,658 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery, while the control group consisted of 1,771 equally obese people who had received traditional care. During 15-year follow-up, 392 people in the and only 110 people in the treatment group developed diabetes.

"Our results show that bariatric surgery can reduce the risk of developing diabetes by more than 80 %", Professor Sjöström says. "This is an extremely high figure."

The study is based on an extensive study entitled Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS), which has given rise to more than 90 scientific articles and demonstrated that bariatric surgery is also highly beneficial when it comes to cancer, cardiovascular disease, total mortality and health-related quality of life.

"Both women and men benefited in terms of diabetes", Professor Sjöström says, "but the degree of obesity at baseline did not affect the results."

The article, "Bariatric Surgery and Prevention of in Swedish " was published in the August 23 issue of NEJM.

Explore further: Study: Obesity surgery can help prevent diabetes

More information: Link to article: bit.ly/PFZtyr

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theskepticalpsychic
not rated yet Sep 18, 2012
And of those patients receiving bariatric surgery, how many of them developed longterm digestive difficulties? And how many gained back the weight they had lost through the surgery? Bariatric surgery is very popular right now, but it does not address the issue of compulsive overeating and it does not ensure longterm slimness. It is, moreover, horrifically expensive, and since it is usually considered a cosmetic surgery, most insurance will not cover it.

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