Feline friends?

September 7, 2012

A report showing that 350,000 people in the UK become infected with the Toxoplasma parasite each year has raised new concerns about its risks and has prompted a rethink of the dangers posed by cats.

A link between serious mental disorders, including schizophrenia, and the parasite, which is spread by cats, was observed, but studies reported in 2009 and extended in 2011 by a team from the University of Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences led by Dr Glenn McConkey provided key that the parasite Toxoplasma gondii could change production of dopamine in the brain.

Disruption of regulation is believed to be involved in a number of human psychological issues.

The work helped trigger a Food Standards Agency (FSA) review of the threat posed by Toxoplasma that reported this week and attracted wide media interest.

The FSA's Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food (ACMSF) recommended further research into routes of Toxoplasma transmission and identification of risks of infection.

Toxoplasmosis is relatively common, with 10-20% of the UK population thought to carry the parasite as cysts.  Most people with the parasite do not suffer apparent health problems. However, the impact on high risk groups including unborn children and people with means that Toxoplasma ranks second among in terms of its impact on public health.

Explore further: Brain parasite directly alters brain chemistry

Related Stories

Brain parasite directly alters brain chemistry

November 4, 2011
A research group from the University of Leeds has shown that infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, found in 10-20 per cent of the UK's population, directly affects the production of dopamine, a key chemical messenger ...

Mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii parasite show Alzheimer's improvements

March 21, 2012
The parasite Toxoplasma gondii has some favorable effects on the pathogenesis and progression of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, reports a Mar. 21 study in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

Hitting parasites where they hurt: New research shows promise in the fight against Toxoplasmosis

May 21, 2012
Toxoplasmosis, a disease caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is one of the most common parasitic infections in the world. In the U.S. it is estimated that more than 22 percent of the population 12 years and older have ...

Recommended for you

Pneumonia vaccine under development provides 'most comprehensive coverage' to date, alleviates antimicrobial concerns

October 20, 2017
In 2004, pneumonia killed more than 2 million children worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. By 2015, the number was less than 1 million.

Newly discovered viral marker could help predict flu severity in infected patients

October 20, 2017
Flu viruses contain defective genetic material that may activate the immune system in infected patients, and new research published in PLOS Pathogens suggests that lower levels of these molecules could increase flu severity.

H7N9 influenza is both lethal and transmissible in animal model for flu

October 19, 2017
In 2013, an influenza virus that had never before been detected began circulating among poultry in China. It caused several waves of human infection and in late 2016, the number of people to become sick from the H7N9 virus ...

Flu simulations suggest pandemics more likely in spring, early summer

October 19, 2017
New statistical simulations suggest that Northern Hemisphere flu pandemics are most likely to emerge in late spring or early summer at the tail end of the normal flu season, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational ...

New insights into herpes virus could inform vaccine development

October 18, 2017
A team of scientists has discovered new insights into the mechanisms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, as well as two antibodies that block the virus' entry into cells. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National ...

Pair of discoveries illuminate new paths to flu and anthrax treatments

October 17, 2017
Two recent studies led by biologists at the University of California San Diego have set the research groundwork for new avenues to treat influenza and anthrax poisoning.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.