Risk of post-cesarean infection up for overweight, obese

September 26, 2012
Risk of post-cesarean infection up for overweight, obese
About 10 percent of U.K. women who undergo cesarean section develop a surgical site infection, with the odds significantly increased for overweight or obese women, according to a study published in the October issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

(HealthDay)—About 10 percent of U.K. women who undergo cesarean section develop a surgical site infection, with the odds significantly increased for overweight or obese women, according to a study published in the October issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

To assess the frequency and risk factors for surgical site infections following cesarean section, Catherine Wloch, of the in London, and associates conducted a prospective study of 4,107 women who underwent cesarean section at 14 hospitals in England between April and September of 2009.

The researchers found that 394 women (9.6 percent) developed a post-cesarean section surgical site infection, and 0.6 percent were readmitted for treatment of the infection. Major independent risk factors for infection included being overweight or obese ( [BMI] of 25 to 30 kg/m²: odds ratio [OR], 1.6, and BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m²: OR, 3.7—both compared with BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m²). Surgical site infection was significantly more likely among younger women (age 20 or younger versus 25 to 30: OR, 1.9) and for operations performed by an associate specialist and staff grade surgeons versus consultants (OR, 1.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.0 to 2.4).

"Given the number of women delivering by cesarean section in the U.K., substantial costs will be incurred as a result of these infections," the authors write." Prevention of these infections should be a clinical and public health priority."

Explore further: Timing of antibiotics important in reducing infections after C-section

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Timing of antibiotics important in reducing infections after C-section

August 2, 2012
Giving antibiotics before cesarean section surgery rather than just after the newborn's umbilical cord is clamped cuts the infection rate at the surgical site in half, according to researchers at Washington University School ...

Reduced baby risk from another cesarean

March 13, 2012
A major study led by the University of Adelaide has found that women who have had one prior cesarean can lower the risk of death and serious complications for their next baby - and themselves - by electing to have another ...

Increased risk of developing asthma by age of 3 after cesarean section

January 10, 2012
A new study supports previous findings that children delivered by cesarean section have an increased risk of developing asthma. The study from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) suggests that children delivered ...

Inducing labor is not associated with higher rates of cesarean sections

June 20, 2011
A new study published in the international Nordic journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (AOGS) reveals that inducing labor in the weeks around term, or from week 39 to week 41, is not connected with higher ...

Recommended for you

Hormone from fat tissue can give protection against polycystic ovary syndrome

August 10, 2017
Obesity and reduced insulin sensitivity are common in polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS. New research based on animal studies, and to be published in the journal PNAS, reveals that the hormone adiponectin can protect against ...

Study in mice may reveal insights into causes of miscarriages for some women

August 9, 2017
Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have identified how natural killer cells in the mouse placenta can cause a fetus to fail to grow in the womb or cause miscarriages.

Insomnia, sleep apnea nearly double the risk of preterm delivery before 34 weeks

August 9, 2017
Pregnant women who are diagnosed with sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia appear to be at risk of delivering their babies before reaching full term, according to an analysis of California births by researchers ...

Elective freezing of IVF embryos linked to higher pregnancy rates in some cases

August 1, 2017
A delay in transferring embryos to the mother improves the success of in vitro fertilization in certain cases, according to a study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Celmatix Inc. and several other ...

Negative birth outcomes linked to air pollution exposure early in pregnancy, study finds

July 27, 2017
Exposure to air pollution early in a pregnancy could increase risk for preterm birth and low birth weight, according to a study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine, and published on July 27 in Environmental Health ...

Study shows a significant ongoing decline in sperm counts of Western men

July 25, 2017
In the first systematic review and meta-analysis of trends in sperm count, researchers from the Hebrew University-Hadassah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.