Pulmonary artery enlargement predicts exacerbation in COPD

September 4, 2012
Pulmonary artery enlargement predicts exacerbation in COPD
For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, computed tomographic measurement of pulmonary artery enlargement, as determined by a ratio of the diameter of the pulmonary artery to the diameter of the aorta of >1, correlates with severe exacerbations, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the European Respiratory Society, held from Sept. 1 to 5 in Vienna.

(HealthDay)—For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), computed tomographic (CT) measurement of pulmonary artery enlargement, as determined by a ratio of the diameter of the pulmonary artery to the diameter of the aorta (PA:A) of >1, correlates with severe exacerbations, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the European Respiratory Society, held from Sept. 1 to 5 in Vienna.

J. Michael Wells, M.D., from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues conducted a multicenter observational trial involving former and current smokers with COPD to determine the association between a PA:A ratio of >1 and a history of severe exacerbations requiring hospitalization at the time of enrollment. The utility of the ratio was assessed as a predictor of events in longitudinal follow-up of this cohort and in an external validation cohort.

The researchers observed a significant association between a PA:A ratio of >1 and a history of severe exacerbations (odds ratio, 4.78). In both the trial cohort and the external validation cohort, a PA:A ratio of >1 correlated independently with an increased risk of future severe exacerbations (odds ratio, 3.44 and 2.80, respectively). PA:A ratio of >1 had the strongest association with severe exacerbations of all the variables analyzed.

"Pulmonary artery enlargement (a PA:A ratio of >1), as detected by CT, was associated with severe of COPD," Wells and colleagues conclude.

Several authors disclosed with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

Explore further: Low vitamin D levels do not increase the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

More information: Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
More Information

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Listeria infection causes early pregnancy loss in primates

February 21, 2017

Researchers in Wisconsin have discovered how Listeria monocytogenes, a common foodborne pathogen, travels through the mother's body to fatally attack the placenta and fetus during early pregnancy in a macaque monkey.

Listeria may be serious miscarriage threat early in pregnancy

February 21, 2017

Listeria, a common food-borne bacterium, may pose a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy than appreciated, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine ...

Ebola linked to habitat destruction

February 20, 2017

A Massey University veterinary scientist has co-authored research suggesting that Ebola virus emergence is linked to the clearing of animal habitat through deforestation in West and Central Africa.

New study determines how long Zika remains in body fluids

February 20, 2017

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine provides evidence that the Zika virus particles remain longer in blood than in urine and some other body fluids. This information suggests that blood serum may be the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.