Developmental outcomes good for late preterm infants in NICU

October 1, 2012
Developmental outcomes good for late preterm infants in NICU
Late preterm infants, born at 34 to 36 weeks of gestation, who receive intensive care, have similar cognitive, motor, and language skills at age 3 as late preterm infants who do not receive intensive care, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Late preterm infants (LPIs), born at 34 to 36 weeks of gestation, who receive intensive care, have similar cognitive, motor, and language skills at age 3 as LPIs who did not receive intensive care, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Pediatrics.

To examine the impact of neonatal intensive or high-dependency care (IC) on at 3 years of age, Jennifer E. McGowan, Ph.D., R.N., from Queen's University Belfast in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a involving 225 children born late preterm in Northern Ireland during 2006.

The researchers found that LPI infants who received IC were more often less mature (34 weeks of gestation) than LPI infants who did not receive IC () and had lower (≤2,500 g) and Apgar scores (<7 at five minutes). LPIs who received IC were more likely than controls to have received resuscitation at birth and to have been born by cesarean delivery. Compared with children in the control group, those born late preterm who received IC had similar cognitive, motor, and language skills at 3 years of age. There was no significant difference in measurements of growth between the groups.

"Despite having increased maternal, perinatal, and neonatal risk factors, there were no significant differences in early childhood development between LPIs who received IC and those who did not," the authors write. "LPIs do not receive routine follow-up after IC and this study provides useful and reassuring data for parents and clinicians on the longer-term outcome of this infant group."

Explore further: Insulin sensitivity lower in adults born preterm

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Insulin sensitivity lower in adults born preterm

September 27, 2012
(HealthDay)—Middle-aged adults who were born preterm, even moderately preterm (32 to 36 weeks' gestation), are less insulin sensitive compared with adults who were born at term, according to research published in the October ...

Study identifies risk factors associated with death of extremely low birth weight infants after NICU

February 9, 2012
Preterm infants born with extremely low birth weights have an increased risk of death during the first year of life. Although researchers have extensively studied risk factors that could contribute to the death of preterm ...

No increase in preterm delivery with Ramadan fasting

August 7, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Pregnant women who fast during the month of Ramadan do not have an increased risk of preterm delivery, regardless of when during gestation the fasting occurs, according to research published online July 25 ...

Recommended for you

Early childhood interventions show mixed results on child development

April 24, 2018
Early childhood interventions may have some efficacy in boosting measures of child health and development in low income countries, but more work is needed to sort out how to implement these interventions, according to a new ...

New study shows prenatal cannabis use associated with low birth weights

April 23, 2018
With marijuana use during pregnancy on the rise, a new study led by the Colorado School of Public Health shows that prenatal cannabis use was associated with a 50 percent increased likelihood of low birth weight, setting ...

New research suggests possible link between sudden infant death syndrome and air pollution

April 20, 2018
A study led by the University of Birmingham suggests a possible association between exposure to certain pollutants and an increased risk of so-called 'cot death'.

Common antidepressants in pregnancy may alter fetal brain development

April 10, 2018
(HealthDay)—Pregnant women who take certain antidepressants may unknowingly compromise the brain development of their child, researchers suggest.

Kids in tough neighborhoods head to ER more often

April 6, 2018
(HealthDay)—Growing up in a disadvantaged neighborhood may mean more visits to the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Infant death study reveals dangerous sleep practices among babysitters, relatives, others

April 2, 2018
Babies who died during their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new study has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.