Doctors who go digital provide higher quality healthcare

October 17, 2012

The use of electronic health records is linked to significantly higher quality care, according to a new study by Lisa Kern and her team, from the Health Information Technology Evaluation Collaborative in the US. Their work appears online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer.

(EHRs) have become a priority in the US, with federal incentives for 'meaningful' use of EHRs. Meaningful use entails tracking and improving specific patient outcomes, as well as gathering and storing information.

Kern and colleagues examined the effect of EHRs on ambulatory care quality in a community-based setting, by comparing the performance of physicians using either EHRs or paper records. They assessed performance on nine specific quality measures for a total of 466 with 74,618 patients, from private practices in the Hudson Valley region of New York.

The quality measures included: eye exams, hemoglobin testing, cholesterol testing, renal function testing for patients with diabetes, colorectal cancer screening, chlamydia screening, breast cancer screening, testing for children with sore throat, and treatment for children with upper respiratory infections.

Approximately half of the physicians studied used EHRs, while the others used paper records. Overall, physicians using EHRs provided higher rates of needed care than physicians using paper, and for four measures in particular: hemoglobin testing in diabetes, , chlamydia screening, and colorectal cancer screening.

The authors conclude: "We found that EHR use is associated with higher quality ambulatory care in a multi-payer community with concerted efforts to support EHR implementation. In contrast to several recent national and statewide studies, which found no effect of EHR use, this study's finding is consistent with national efforts to promote meaningful use of EHRs."

Explore further: Electronic health records shown to improve the quality of patient care

More information: Kern LM et al (2012). Electronic health records and ambulatory quality of care. Journal of General Internal Medicine; DOI 10.1007/s11606-012-2237-8

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gwrede
not rated yet Oct 17, 2012
Correlation is not causality, for the umpteenth time!

You can't just take it for granted that using digital records somehow changes your behavior as a doctor!

A much more probable explanation is that some doctors don't want to see the major effort of learning computers, choosing and learning the required software, paying for the software, and then either keeping up with two sets of records (one paper, one digital), or typing in the old records in the new system. All this in addition to their regular work.

Wouldn't it stand to reason that precisely these are the doctors who do a worse job at the quality metrics in the article? That is, they figure out reasons to not do some of the tedious or time consuming or laborious examinations or actions.

Now, if the authors of this article wanted to prove they are any better than these "bad" doctors, they really should do _their_ work diligently.

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