Genetic switch shuts down lung cancer tumors in mice

October 25, 2012

Yale researchers manipulated a tiny genetic switch and halted growth of aggressive lung cancer tumors in mice and even prevented tumors from forming.

The activation of a single managed to neutralize the effects of two of the most notorious genes in cancer's arsenal, suggesting it may have a role treating several forms of cancer, the researchers report in the Nov. 1 issue of the journal .

"This is pretty much the best pre-clinical data that show microRNAs can be effective in lung cancer treatment," said Frank Slack, professor of molecular, cellular & developmental biology, researcher for the Yale Cancer Center, and senior author of the paper. "These cancer genes are identical to ones found in many forms of human cancers and we are hopeful the microRNA will be of therapeutic benefit in human cancer."

Unlike drugs that act upon existing proteins, microRNAs are small pieces of genetic material that can shut down and turn off genes that produce the proteins. Slack and co-author Andrea Kasinski wanted to see if one of these microRNAs, miR-34, could block the actions of K-Ras and p53 genes, which promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells, respectively. Mice with these two mutant genes invariably develop tumors but were cancer-free when researchers activated miR-34. Also, tumor growth was halted in mice that were treated with miR-34 after they had developed cancer.

Explore further: Nanoparticles cut off 'addicted' tumors from source of their survival

Related Stories

Nanoparticles cut off 'addicted' tumors from source of their survival

May 28, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Yale biologists and engineers have designed drug-loaded nanoparticles that target the soft underbelly of many types of cancer — a tiny gene product that tumors depend upon to replicate and survive.

In cancer, molecular signals that recruit blood vessels also trigger metastasis

December 19, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Cancer cells are most deadly when they’re on the move — able not only to destroy whatever organ they are first formed in, but also to create colonies elsewhere in the body. New research has now ...

Recommended for you

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension

November 17, 2017
Shortness of breath and respiratory distress often increase the suffering of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. These symptoms can be triggered by pulmonary hypertension, as scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart ...

Researchers discover an Achilles heel in a lethal leukemia

November 16, 2017
Researchers have discovered how a linkage between two proteins in acute myeloid leukemia enables cancer cells to resist chemotherapy and showed that disrupting the linkage could render the cells vulnerable to treatment. St. ...

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs

November 16, 2017
Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, ...

Pharmacoscopy improves therapy for relapsed blood cancer in a first clinical trial

November 16, 2017
Researchers at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna presented a preliminary report in The Lancet Hematology on the clinical impact of an integrated ex vivo approach called pharmacoscopy. The procedures measure single-cell ...

Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

November 15, 2017
A new study focused on describing genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic branch of that tumor, and additional diversity found in tumor DNA in the blood stream could help ...

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development

November 14, 2017
Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.