Study: Privatized Medicare would raise premiums

October 15, 2012 by Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar

A study out Monday says most Medicare recipients—59 percent—would pay higher premiums under a hypothetical privatized system, with wide regional differences leading to big hikes in some states.

In the senior-rich political swing state of Florida, the study says premiums for traditional would jump more than $200 a month.

The report by the nonpartisan carries a prominent disclaimer that it should not be taken as an analysis of the proposal by Republican presidential candidate and running mate Paul Ryan, partly because their plan lacks specifics.

However, Kaiser says it is modeled a similar approach to Romney-Ryan.

The Obama campaign pounced on the findings, while the Romney camp pointed to the disclaimer, saying the report doesn't reflect the candidate's own plan.

Explore further: Medicare in focus as Obama, Ryan trade charges

shares

Related Stories

Medicare in focus as Obama, Ryan trade charges

August 18, 2012
(AP) — Vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan introduced his 78-year-old mother to voters Saturday as he defended the Republican ticket from withering criticism from President Barack Obama for proposals to overhaul the ...

Campaign says private Romney emails possibly hacked

June 6, 2012
Authorities are investigating a report that Mitt Romney's personal email account has been hacked, his presidential campaign said Tuesday.

New analysis of presidential candidates' health care plans estimates uninsured by 2022

October 2, 2012
The number of uninsured individuals is estimated to increase in every state and to 72 million nationwide—with children and low- and middle-income Americans particularly hard hit—under Governor Mitt Romney's plan to repeal ...

Romney threads position on health law 'tax'

July 5, 2012
Republican White House hopeful Mitt Romney has appeared to contradict previous campaign statements by saying President Barack Obama's health reform law entails a "tax" and not a penalty.

Biden won debate, student poll app finds

October 15, 2012
Six in 10 college students say Joe Biden outperformed Paul Ryan in Thursday's vice presidential debate, according to a nationwide poll conducted with a smartphone application developed by Professor Phil Resnik at Maryland ...

Recommended for you

Breathing dirty air may harm kidneys, study finds

September 21, 2017
Outdoor air pollution has long been linked to major health conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A new study now adds kidney disease to the list, according to ...

Excess dietary manganese promotes staph heart infection

September 21, 2017
Too much dietary manganese—an essential trace mineral found in leafy green vegetables, fruits and nuts—promotes infection of the heart by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus ("staph").

Being active saves lives whether a gym workout, walking to work or washing the floor

September 21, 2017
Physical activity of any kind can prevent heart disease and death, says a large international study involving more than 130,000 people from 17 countries published this week in The Lancet.

Frequent blood donations safe for some, but not all

September 21, 2017
(HealthDay)—Some people may safely donate blood as often as every eight weeks—but that may not be a healthy choice for all, a new study suggests.

Higher manganese levels in children correlate with lower IQ scores, study finds

September 21, 2017
A study led by environmental health researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine finds that children in East Liverpool, Ohio with higher levels of Manganese (Mn) had lower IQ scores. The research appears ...

One e-cigarette with nicotine leads to adrenaline changes in nonsmokers' hearts

September 20, 2017
A new UCLA study found that healthy nonsmokers experienced increased adrenaline levels in their heart after one electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) with nicotine but there were no increased adrenaline levels when the study ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.