Hobby Lobby asks judge to block health care law

November 1, 2012 by Tim Talley

(AP)—An arts and craft supply company says part of the new federal health care law should be blocked because it requires coverage for morning-after and week-after birth control pills.

Hobby Lobby wants to set aside mandated insurance coverage for the drugs, saying their ability to prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in a womb is tantamount to abortion.

At a hearing Thursday in Oklahoma City, a government lawyer disagreed and said the nation has a compelling interest in mandating insurance coverage for contraceptives.

U.S. District Judge Joe Heaton did not immediately rule on Hobby Lobby's request for an injunction.

Hobby Lobby says the law violates its religious beliefs. The government says Hobby Lobby is a secular employer that by definition does not exercise religion.

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