New mobile app helps migraine sufferers track and analyze pain

November 5, 2012, University of Michigan

A new iPhone app developed at the University of Michigan lets migraine or facial pain patients easily track and record their pain, which in turn helps the treating clinician develop a pain management plan.

Dr. Alexandre DaSilva, director of the & Orofacial Pain Effort (H.O.P.E.) at the U-M School of Dentistry and one of the project developers, said the app will help people with migraine, temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and other types of facial nerve pain.

Such pain can change over time, have multiple triggers, or the same patient might respond differently to the same treatment from one attack to the next. But to develop a successful pain management plan, the researchers say it's crucial that patients, especially sufferers, relay this information to physicians. However, it can be difficult to keep a pain diary in the midst of an attack.

DaSilva said PainTrek makes it easy: Patients just screen tap a 3D skull to pinpoint pain location and answer questions regarding intensity, external influences and other factors.

The app was developed for iPhone, iPad and iPod platforms. The Apple app store will tentatively release the free app in November. The was co-created by Eric Maslowski with collaboration from Stephanie O'Malley, Sean Sheehan and Sean Petty, all from the U-M 3D Lab.

Explore further: Migraine patients find pain relief in electrical brain stimulation

More information:
For more on DaSilva: www.dent.umich.edu/?q=bms/facultyandstaff/dasilva
H.O.P.E.: www.dent.umich.edu/?q=bms/bmsresearch/dasilvalab
3D lab: um3d.dc.umich.edu/

Related Stories

Migraine patients find pain relief in electrical brain stimulation

April 20, 2012
Chronic migraine sufferers saw significant pain relief after four weeks of electrical brain stimulation in the part of the brain responsible for voluntary movement, the motor cortex, according to a new study.

Technology eases migraine pain in the deep brain

May 1, 2012
Migraine pain sits at the upper end of the typical pain scale – an angry-red section often labeled "severe." At this intensity, pain is debilitating. Yet many sufferers do not get relief from – or cannot tolerate ...

A pill to prevent migraine? Discovery of migraine gene could put it on the horizon

June 1, 2011
The discovery of a gene for migraine holds great promise in the quest for new approaches -- possibly even a pill -- for preventing the disease, says a panel of experts presenting data at the annual scientific meeting of the ...

Recommended for you

New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD risk

January 16, 2018
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk ...

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic

January 16, 2018
While past exposure to influenza A viruses often builds immunity to similar, and sometimes different, strains of the virus, Canadian researchers are calling for more attention to exceptions to that rule.

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses

January 11, 2018
Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.