Optimal dose suggested for dasatinib in ovarian cancer

November 19, 2012
Optimal dose suggested for dasatinib in ovarian cancer
A phase I trial of dasatinib combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin has determined the optimal dose of dasatinib and suggested some efficacy in women with advanced or recurrent ovarian cancer, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

(HealthDay)—A phase I trial of dasatinib combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin has determined the optimal dose of dasatinib and suggested some efficacy in women with advanced or recurrent ovarian cancer, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

As part of a phase I trial, Angeles Alvarez Secord, M.D., from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues treated a total of 20 patients with advanced and recurrent epithelial with escalating doses of dasatinib (100, 120, and 150 mg daily), combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin.

The researchers found that concurrent administration of dasatinib with paclitaxel did not significantly alter the effects of either dasatinib or paclitaxel. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included myalgia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue. Eight patients achieved complete or partial remission, 10 patients had stable disease, and two patients could not be evaluated. The median progression-free survival was 7.8 months and the median overall survival was 16.2 months. No biomarker could be identified to determine which patients would benefit from dasatinib.

"Due to the high incidence of myelosuppression with subsequent cycles, the recommended phase II dose of dasatinib is 150 mg daily in combination with paclitaxel and ," Secord and colleagues conclude. "The combination was safe with evidence of clinical activity."

The study was partially supported by a research grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Explore further: Cetuximab, paclitaxel combo active in urothelial cancer

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Cetuximab, paclitaxel combo active in urothelial cancer

August 29, 2012
(HealthDay)—The monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cetuximab, augments the antitumor activity of paclitaxel in patients with previously treated urothelial cancer, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

New therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat subtype of ovarian cancer identified

July 24, 2017
A potential new therapeutic strategy for a difficult-to-treat form of ovarian cancer has been discovered by Wistar scientists. The findings were published online in Nature Cell Biology.

Immune cells the missing ingredient in new bladder cancer treatment

July 24, 2017
New research offers a possible explanation for why a new type of cancer treatment hasn't been working as expected against bladder cancer.

Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers

July 20, 2017
Virtually all cancer treatments used today also damage normal cells, causing the toxic side effects associated with cancer treatment. A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center ...

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes

July 20, 2017
Several known factors are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer including increasing age, being overweight after menopause, alcohol intake, and family history. However, the underlying biologic mechanisms through ...

Immune-cell numbers predict response to combination immunotherapy in melanoma

July 20, 2017
Whether a melanoma patient will better respond to a single immunotherapy drug or two in combination depends on the abundance of certain white blood cells within their tumors, according to a new study conducted by UC San Francisco ...

Discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

July 19, 2017
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.