Researchers team to develop point-of-need traumatic brain injury diagnostic device

November 28, 2012

A*STAR's Institute of Microelectronics and SFC Fluidics, a USA microfluidics-based biomedical device development company, will be collaborating to develop a portable diagnostic tool for rapid triaging of traumatic brain injury (TBI) victims and to improve the treatment strategies.  TBI is one of the most common causes of death and disability in the world, usually resulting from blasts, falls, knocks, traffic accidents, and assaults.

The proposed is a fully-integrated, automated biosensor device which requires only a drop of blood to detect up to three released by the brain after sustaining injury. The biomarker readings will be displayed on an easy-to-read screen, along with an indicator alerting the care giver to the severity of the injury.

Unlike conventional diagnostic tools such as neurological tests and computed tomography (CT) scans, the biosensor device does not require any trained personnel for sample handling. The portable feature of the device facilitates rapid on-site diagnosis of the injury. Caregivers will be able to respond quickly with the proper course of treatment to prevent injury aggravation.

The biosensor device leverages and integrates IME's silicon-based microfluidic sensor and biosensor technology and bio-electrochemical assay development capability.  IME has built up strong capabilities in biomedical microsystems and has established deep collaborations with the clinical community and key industry partners in Singapore to advance silicon-based Point-Of-Care diagnostics devices.

"This collaboration exemplifies the extension of "More-than-Moore" technologies to healthcare. Building on our core capabilities in silicon-based and biosensor technology, we can help our partner create innovative diagnostic tools to improve TBI treatment," says Prof. Dim-Lee Kwong, Executive Director of IME. "Working with SFC provides a good opportunity for us to deepen our knowledge in healthcare applications to enable high quality and affordable healthcare solutions."

"We are excited to partner with IME, a leading R&D institute with a diverse suite of capabilities, including microfluidics, MEMS, nanoelectronics, integration and packaging. SFC has been expanding fast for the last few years.  We have developed quite a few very exciting new technologies in the microfluidics and biomedical sensor areas.  Some of these technologies have been commercialized.  By leveraging on IME's industry standard mass production facilities, we can cut down the product development cycle time.  "The TBI project is the start of a longer term collaboration that SFC will explore together with IME," commented by Dr. Sai Kumar, Vice President of Research and development, SFC Fluidics.

Explore further: UNL research to power handheld traumatic brain injury diagnostic device

More information: www.news.gov.sg/public/sgpc/en … IME_SFC_FLUIDICS.pdf

Related Stories

UNL research to power handheld traumatic brain injury diagnostic device

July 12, 2012
 A handheld tool is under development to diagnose traumatic brain injuries on the spot using technology developed by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln chemist. Such a device could yield critical and in some cases life-saving ...

Drug development cycle shortened with new silicon-based screening tool

July 20, 2011
Researchers from A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics (IME) have developed a lateral silicon-based drug screening tool that has demonstrated simultaneous capture of 12 individual cells – 12 times higher throughput than ...

Traumatic brain injury: NIH-funded researchers will assess biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment

August 3, 2011
Biomarkers in the bloodstream could provide physicians with a quick and accurate method of assessing the severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and helping deliver and monitor the results of therapies, such as progesterone ...

Recommended for you

Researchers develop new method to generate human antibodies

July 24, 2017
An international team of scientists has developed a method to rapidly produce specific human antibodies in the laboratory. The technique, which will be described in a paper to be published July 24 in The Journal of Experimental ...

A sodium surprise: Engineers find unexpected result during cardiac research

July 20, 2017
Irregular heartbeat—or arrhythmia—can have sudden and often fatal consequences. A biomedical engineering team at Washington University in St. Louis examining molecular behavior in cardiac tissue recently made a surprising ...

Want to win at sports? Take a cue from these mighty mice

July 20, 2017
As student athletes hit training fields this summer to gain the competitive edge, a new study shows how the experiences of a tiny mouse can put them on the path to winning.

'Smart' robot technology could give stroke rehab a boost

July 19, 2017
Scientists say they have developed a "smart" robotic harness that might make it easier for people to learn to walk again after a stroke or spinal cord injury.

Engineered liver tissue expands after transplant

July 19, 2017
Many diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatitis, can lead to liver failure. More than 17,000 Americans suffering from these diseases are now waiting for liver transplants, but significantly fewer livers are available.

Lunatic Fringe gene plays key role in the renewable brain

July 19, 2017
The discovery that the brain can generate new cells - about 700 new neurons each day - has triggered investigations to uncover how this process is regulated. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Jan and Dan Duncan ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.