Bariatric surgery in extremely obese adolescents may also help treat previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities

January 21, 2013
Bariatric surgery in extremely obese adolescents may also help treat previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities
Many of the abnormalities that were documented during the initial baseline study showed significant improvement after the weight loss had been obtained.

(Medical Xpress)—This time of year many people make resolutions to live a healthier lifestyle, exercise more, lose weight and eat better. For the adolescents who are extremely obese in this country, diet and exercise alone often are not enough to get their weight down. Some of those teens will require weight loss surgery to improve their overall health. According to a recent study published in the January print issue of the Journal of Pediatric Surgerybariatric surgery in extremely obese adolescents also was shown to be beneficial in helping to reverse previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities believed to be linked to severe obesity.

The study included a retrospective analysis of 10 adolescent patients (nine female) from Nationwide Children's Hospital who underwent weight loss surgery between August and December 2008. imaging using (CMR) was performed on these patients in the months leading up to bariatric surgery and revealed (such as increased left ventricular mass, left ventricular dilation, hypertension) in all patients.

"What we found was that the and function in these extremely obese adolescents scheduled for bariatric surgery, was much more impaired than one might have thought," said study co-author John Bauer, PhD, principal investigator in the Center for Perinatal Research at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital. "In addition, more than half of the patients we looked at had significant that would be on par with a middle-aged person with real in the short term."

The video will load shortly

Within the first post-operative year (mean range of 7-13 months), patients were re-evaluated using CMR. Results showed that their previously recorded cardiovascular abnormalities were reversed.

"Many of the abnormalities that we documented during the initial baseline study showed significant improvement after the weight loss had been obtained," said the study's co-author Marc Michalsky, MD, surgical director of the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital. "This is a small, preliminary study that shows the significance of in morbidly obese teens and that additional, more robust investigations are needed to understand how weight loss surgery can help this patient population."

In the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's, patients first go through several months of evaluation to see if they are even candidates for weight loss surgery. This includes an introductory information session attended by the adolescent and parent and assessments of the potential candidate by a number of staff in the Center including dieticians, bariatric nurse practitioners, psychologists, physical therapists and surgeons. Candidates for weight loss surgery are those that have gone through several failed attempts at diet and exercise regiments. These teenagers have significant organ damage and their quality of life is poor, Dr. Michalsky said.

"Bariatric surgery in adolescents is never a cosmetic procedure," explained Dr. Michalsky who is also a faculty member at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "These teens are very sick, they are suffering and they can truly benefit in overall health from ."

Nationwide Children's is one of a few centers in the country involved in long-term clinical research of adolescent bariatric surgery, looking not only at what happens in the short-term post-surgery, but long-term as well.

Explore further: Bariatric surgery in adolescents improves obesity-related diseases within first 2 years

Related Stories

Bariatric surgery in adolescents improves obesity-related diseases within first 2 years

January 31, 2012
Today, about one in five children in the United States are obese. That means that in just one generation alone the number of obese kids in this country has quadrupled.

Heavy exercise not too high a hurdle for bariatric surgery patients

July 7, 2011
Bariatric surgery patients can undertake a rigorous exercise program after the procedure, in order to continue to lose weight and avoid regaining weight, according to a UT Southwestern Medical Center study.

Vitamin D deficiency common among adolescents evaluated for weight-loss surgery

June 25, 2012
Most adolescents preparing for weight-loss, or bariatric, surgery are deficient in vitamin D, a new study demonstrates. The results to be presented at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

Women should wait at least 12 months before trying for a baby following weight loss surgery

January 10, 2013
Women should wait at least 12 months before trying for a baby following weight loss surgery and need further advice and information on reproductive issues, suggests a new evidence-based literature review published today in ...

Recommended for you

World's first child hand transplant a 'success'

July 19, 2017
The first child in the world to undergo a double hand transplant is now able to write, feed and dress himself, doctors said Tuesday, declaring the ground-breaking operation a success after 18 months.

Knee surgery—have we been doing it wrong?

July 18, 2017
A team of University at Buffalo medical doctors have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery.

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vessels

July 17, 2017
The liver is a particularly squishy, slippery organ, prone to shifting both deadly tumors and life-preserving blood vessels by inches between the time they're discovered on a CT scan and when the patient is lying on an operating ...

Researchers discover indicator of lung transplant rejection

July 13, 2017
Research by scientists at Dignity Health St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center's Norton Thoracic Institute was published in the July 12, 2017 issue of Science Translational Medicine titled "Zbtb7a induction in alveolar ...

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

July 7, 2017
Like many surgeons, Dr. Jason Spector is often faced with the challenge of securely closing the abdominal wall without injuring the intestines. If the process goes awry, there can be serious consequences for patients, including ...

Success with first 20 patients undergoing minimally invasive pancreatic transplant surgery

June 29, 2017
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that their first series of a minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic pancreas disease, known as severe pancreatitis, resulted in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.