Bisexual women at especially high risk of sexual violence, CDC says

January 25, 2013
Bisexual women at especially high risk of sexual violence, CDC says
Six out of 10 reported rape, stalking or other abuse, often early in life.

(HealthDay)—Bisexual women in the United States are more likely to suffer from domestic violence than either lesbian or heterosexual women, a new government report shows.

The data, released Friday by the U.S. , is the first to look at rates of , sexual violence and stalking based on sexual orientation. The CDC team also found that lifetime levels of sexual and physical violence among lesbians and gay men were equal to or higher than those of heterosexuals.

"We know that violence affects everyone, regardless of sexual orientation. This report suggests that lesbians, gay men and bisexuals in this country suffer a heavy toll of sexual violence and stalking committed by an intimate partner," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release.

According to the report, about 61 percent of bisexual women reported some incident of rape, , and/or stalking by an intimate partner, compared with about 43 percent of lesbian women and 35 percent of .

Ninety percent of those bisexual women who had experienced intimate partner violence had only male perpetrators, while two-thirds of lesbian victims had only female perpetrators.

Regardless of their , most women who suffered sexual violence said that they were victimized by men, the CDC report found.

This abuse often occurs early in life, the researchers noted. About half (48 percent) of female bisexual victims and about 28 percent of female heterosexual victims suffered their first rape between the ages of 11 and 17 years, according to the study, which was based on 2010 data from the U.S. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

It's not enough to provide help to the victims of after the event, Frieden said.

"While intervening and providing services are important, prevention is equally critical," he noted.

Explore further: Sexual orientation affects cancer survivorship

More information: The American Psychiatric Association has more about domestic violence.

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Sean_W
1 / 5 (1) Jan 26, 2013
Men are less likely to report instances either informally or formally. When they do report them they are less likely to be categorized as violence or stalking. Forced sex on men isn't even classified as rape in many jurisdictions because of the myth that a woman can't rape by violent subjugation and manual stimulation. When a woman rapes a man (who has probably been taught never to use violence against women, even in defence) it is treated as a joke. Men who report violence by an intimate partner face being arrested as the male party in a violent domestic dispute.
gwrede
not rated yet Jan 27, 2013
We know that violence affects everyone, regardless of sexual orientation.
Well! This tells more of the American society than the rest of the article. The concept of people living entirely out of the reach of violence seems incomprehensible to them.

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