Cancer death rates over a third higher in men than women

January 29, 2013

Men are over 35 per cent more likely to die from cancer than women in the UK, according to a new report released today .

The report showed that 202 per 100,000 died from cancer compared to 147 per 100,000 women in 2010.

And this difference is even starker when and sex-specific cancers such as prostate, testicular and are removed from the analysis – men were then 67 per cent more likely to die from the disease.

The analysis also showed that men are almost twice as likely as women to die from and almost three times as likely to die from oesophageal cancer.

This contrast in cancer death rates between the sexes may be down to more men being diagnosed with types of cancers that are harder to treat such as cancers of the bladder, liver and oesophagus.

The report – presented at the Men's Health Forum conference in London and produced by Cancer Research UK, the Men's Health Forum and the National Cancer Intelligence Network – also highlighted that men of a working age, under 65, were 58 per cent more likely to die from cancers that affect both men and women.

Cancer is the leading cause of death in men in the UK with around 82,500 men losing their life to the disease every year.

Professor Alan White, chairman of the Men's Health Forum and co-author of the report based at Leeds Metropolitan University, said: "The impact cancer has on is often overlooked, but these are men whose life is cut too short by the disease. Our report highlights just how big a problem cancer is and highlights the need to understand the reasons why men are more likely to die of cancer. It's crucial that the NHS leads the way in taking a more proactive approach to prevent men both getting and dying from cancer prematurely.

"The Men's Health Forum is campaigning for a better explanation for these differences and more male-focused work so that fewer men are struck down by cancer."

Research has previously shown that more than 40 per cent of cancers in men could be prevented by changes to lifestyle. A second report, also released today at the conference by Cancer Research UK, highlights the impact various lifestyle factors have on a man's risk of developing cancer. It shows that smoking remains the largest preventable cause of cancer, responsible for 36,500 cancers in men every year.

After smoking, being overweight, drinking alcohol and poor diets are the most important causes of cancer in men.

Catherine Thomson, Cancer Research UK's head of statistics and co-author of the reports, said: "Our work highlights the cancer toll for men across the UK. This needs action and Cancer Research UK is supporting a range of research into men's cancers. We're one of the UK's largest funders of research into prostate and testicular cancers and this work is leading to new and better treatments.

"Men can help stack the odds of avoiding in their favour by quitting smoking, cutting down on alcohol and eating plenty of fruit and vegetables."

Explore further: Cancer mortality rates are higher in men than women

More information: The two reports are available from here.

Related Stories

Cancer mortality rates are higher in men than women

July 12, 2011
Overall cancer mortality rates are higher for men than women in the United States, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Personalised prostate cancer screening may save thousands from unnecessary treatment

November 5, 2012
Targeting prostate cancer screening based on a man's age and genes could potentially save thousands of men from unnecessary treatment and save the NHS millions of pounds. The research is presented at the NCRI Cancer Conference ...

Latest cancer research unveiled

June 20, 2011
Two leading experts from the Division of Cancer Studies at King’s presented their latest research into cancer survival this week at the National Cancer Intelligence Network conference in London.

Poor men more likely to die from bowel cancer

November 7, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Deprived men are more likely to die from bowel cancer than men from the most affluent section of society, new research presented at the NCRI Cancer Conference in Liverpool this week shows.

People fear cancer more than other serious illness

August 16, 2011
More than a third of people in the UK fear cancer more than other life-threatening conditions – such as Alzheimer’s, stroke and heart disease according to a Cancer Research UK survey.

Recommended for you

Vitamin C may encourage blood cancer stem cells to die

August 17, 2017
Vitamin C may "tell" faulty stem cells in the bone marrow to mature and die normally, instead of multiplying to cause blood cancers. This is the finding of a study led by researchers from Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone ...

Scientists develop novel immunotherapy technology for prostate cancer

August 17, 2017
A study led by scientists at The Wistar Institute describes a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer based on the use of synthetic DNA to directly encode protective antibodies against a cancer specific ...

Outdoor light at night linked with increased breast cancer risk in women

August 17, 2017
Women who live in areas with higher levels of outdoor light at night may be at higher risk for breast cancer than those living in areas with lower levels, according to a large long-term study from Harvard T.H. Chan School ...

Scientists develop blood test that spots tumor-derived DNA in people with early-stage cancers

August 16, 2017
In a bid to detect cancers early and in a noninvasive way, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have developed a test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA in blood and have used it to ...

Toxic formaldehyde is produced inside our own cells, scientists discover

August 16, 2017
New research has revealed that some of the toxin formaldehyde in our bodies does not come from our environment - it is a by-product of an essential reaction inside our own cells. This could provide new targets for developing ...

Cell cycle-blocking drugs can shrink tumors by enlisting immune system in attack on cancer

August 16, 2017
In the brief time that drugs known as CDK4/6 inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, doctors have made a startling observation: in certain patients, the drugs—designed to halt cancer ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.