Many suffer chronic pain after breast cancer surgery, study finds

January 22, 2013
Many suffer chronic pain after breast cancer surgery, study finds
Researchers call for better pain management.

(HealthDay)—About one-quarter of women who've had breast cancer surgery have significant and persistent breast pain six months after the procedure, a new study finds.

Women with breast pain before surgery were most likely to have long-term breast pain after the operation, according to the study recently published in the Journal of Pain.

Researchers followed 400 women after and found that about 12 reported severe breast pain, 13 percent had and 43 percent had mild pain that lasted for six months. Just under 32 percent had no breast pain.

Four patient characteristics were associated with severe pain: younger age, less education, lower income and being non-white. Younger age was also associated with having moderate or mild pain, the University of California, San Francisco researchers said.

The major clinical factors associated with severe pain were: breast pain before surgery, changes in breast sensation, severity of pain after surgery, number of lymph nodes removed and undergoing additional lymph node removal.

The findings suggest that improvements in pain management after surgery are needed to reduce the risk of persistent , the researchers said, according to a journal news release.

Explore further: Pre-op breast pain in about 28 percent of breast cancer patients

More information: The American Cancer Society has more about breast cancer surgery.

Related Stories

Pre-op breast pain in about 28 percent of breast cancer patients

June 15, 2012
(HealthDay) -- More than a quarter of women about to undergo breast cancer surgery experience breast pain, with genetic polymorphisms in inflammatory cytokines correlating with pain, according to a study published in the ...

Research finds little benefit of breast imaging tests for women with breast pain

March 7, 2012
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have found that women with breast pain who receive imaging (mammograms, MRIs or ultrasounds) as part of breast pain evaluation, ...

Study uncovers simple way of predicting severe pain following breast cancer surgery

September 5, 2012
Women having surgery for breast cancer are up to three times more likely to have severe pain in the first week after surgery if they suffer from other painful conditions, such as arthritis, low back pain and migraine, according ...

Recommended for you

Study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer

July 25, 2017
Estrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment—and breast ...

Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

July 25, 2017
A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and "chemo brain": a brisk walk.

Breaking the genetic resistance of lung cancer and melanoma

July 25, 2017
Researchers from Monash University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York) have discovered why some cancers – particularly lung cancer and melanoma – are able to quickly develop deadly resistance ...

New therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat subtype of ovarian cancer identified

July 24, 2017
A potential new therapeutic strategy for a difficult-to-treat form of ovarian cancer has been discovered by Wistar scientists. The findings were published online in Nature Cell Biology.

Immune cells the missing ingredient in new bladder cancer treatment

July 24, 2017
New research offers a possible explanation for why a new type of cancer treatment hasn't been working as expected against bladder cancer.

Anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent inhibits glioblastoma growth and radiation resistance

July 24, 2017
Glioblastoma is a primary brain tumor with dismal survival rates, even after treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. A small subpopulation of tumor cells—glioma stem cells—is responsible for glioblastoma's ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.