Concurrent breast augmentation / mastopexy deemed safe

January 14, 2013
Concurrent breast augmentation + mastopexy deemed safe
The overall complication and reoperation rate for a one-stage simultaneous breast augmentation/mastopexy procedure is about 23 percent, according to research published in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

(HealthDay)—The overall complication and reoperation rate for a one-stage simultaneous breast augmentation/mastopexy procedure is about 23 percent, according to research published in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

To examine the challenges and safety concerns associated with simultaneous /mastopexy, M. Bradley Calobrace, M.D., of the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky, and colleagues conducted a five-year retrospective case analysis of 430 mastopexy operations, which included 332 simultaneous augmentations/mastopexies.

The researchers found that the overall was 22.9 percent for simultaneous procedures, which most commonly included capsular contracture, poor scarring, and recurrent ptosis. Of the complications, 15.1 percent were tissue-related and 7.8 percent were implant-related. The overall reoperation rate was 23.2 percent, with 13.3 percent of these for tissue-related reasons and 9.9 percent for implant-related reasons. The tissue-related rate of reoperation was similar to the 10.2 percent reoperation rate observed in mastopexy-only procedures.

"Although a 23.2 percent reoperation rate may be considered too high for a purely cosmetic procedure, staging the operation, which is commonly posed as the alternative, does not appear to offer any advantages of safety in the majority of cases in this study," the authors write. "We acknowledge the inherent difficulty posed in a combined approach, and a potential reoperation should be part of preoperative counseling with appropriate candidates for the procedure."

One author disclosed to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: One in five women with breast cancer has a reoperation after breast conserving surgery

More information: Full Text

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rhys_branman
not rated yet Jan 14, 2013
It was my understanding that the point of the study reported was about the difference in performing the surgeries together. The study compared women who underwent the combination of the two procedures with women who only had breast lift surgery. The results were not significantly different. Women who only had breast lift surgery had a 10 percent revision rate, while women who had the combined surgeries had a 13 percent revision rate. Most of the revisions were related to problems with the implants themselves. Of course this must be discussed preoperatively.

Dr Rhys Branman
Little Rock Cosmetic Surgery Center

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