General anesthesia ups knee replacement complications

February 15, 2013
General anesthesia ups knee replacement complications
For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, use of general anesthesia is associated with a significant increase in complications compared with spinal anesthesia, according to a study published in the Feb. 6 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, use of general anesthesia is associated with a significant increase in complications compared with spinal anesthesia, according to a study published in the Feb. 6 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Andrew J. Pugely, M.D., from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues utilized data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to identify 14,052 patients who underwent primary total from 2005 to 2010. Thirty-day complications were then noted.

The researchers found that 42.9 percent of patients underwent spinal anesthesia and 57.1 percent underwent . For the spinal anesthesia group, the unadjusted frequency of superficial wound infections was significantly lower, and there were significantly fewer blood transfusions and overall complications compared with the general anesthesia group. The spinal anesthesia group also had a significantly shorter length of surgery and length of hospital stay. The overall likelihood of complications was significantly higher with general anesthesia, after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio, 1.129). The difference between the groups in the short-term complication rate was largest for patients with the highest number of preoperative complications. Independent risk factors for short-term complication after total knee arthroplasty included age, female sex, black race, elevated creatinine, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, operative time, and choice of anesthetic.

"In summary, these results indicate that patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty who receive spinal anesthesia have a significantly decreased risk of complications compared with patients who receive general anesthesia," the authors write.

Explore further: Anesthesia type affects outcomes of bilateral knee replacement surgery

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Anesthesia type affects outcomes of bilateral knee replacement surgery

October 26, 2012
Using regional anesthesia rather than general anesthesia reduces the need for blood transfusions in patients undergoing bilateral total knee replacement, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery, ...

More complications for inpatient lumbar discectomy

February 4, 2013
(HealthDay)—Patients undergoing inpatient lumbar discectomy have significantly higher overall complication rates than those treated as outpatients, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

Lower cuff pressure reduces wound complications in TKA

January 14, 2013
(HealthDay)—Lower tourniquet cuff pressure, achieved using a limb-occlusion pressure method, is associated with reduced postoperative wound complications after total knee arthroplasty, according to research published in ...

Regional anesthesia reduces complications and death for hip fracture patients

June 20, 2012
In a study of more than 18,000 patients having surgery for hip fracture, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that the use of regional anesthesia versus general anesthesia, ...

Cold-air anesthesia reduces pain of laser treatment

June 22, 2012
(HealthDay) -- In ablative fractionated carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser treatment for photoaging, cold-air anesthesia used in conjunction with topical anesthesia reduces pain significantly more than topical anesthesia alone, according ...

Less invasive anesthetic methods better for endovascular aneurysm repair

October 27, 2011
Researchers have identified a safer, more cost effective way to provide anesthesia for patients undergoing endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm – a common, often asymptomatic condition that, if not found ...

Recommended for you

Smoking raises risk of aneurysm recurrence after endovascular treatment

August 17, 2017
In a new study, researchers report people who have experienced an aneurysm have another reason to quit smoking.

Study adds to evidence that most prescribed opioid pills go unused

August 2, 2017
In a review of half a dozen published studies in which patients self-reported use of opioids prescribed to them after surgery, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a substantial majority of patients used only some or ...

Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery times

August 2, 2017
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed ...

World's first child hand transplant a 'success'

July 19, 2017
The first child in the world to undergo a double hand transplant is now able to write, feed and dress himself, doctors said Tuesday, declaring the ground-breaking operation a success after 18 months.

Knee surgery—have we been doing it wrong?

July 18, 2017
A team of University at Buffalo medical doctors have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery.

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vessels

July 17, 2017
The liver is a particularly squishy, slippery organ, prone to shifting both deadly tumors and life-preserving blood vessels by inches between the time they're discovered on a CT scan and when the patient is lying on an operating ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.