Diabetes practice patterns, knowledge gaps identified

February 13, 2013

(HealthDay)—Practice patterns and knowledge gaps vary for health care providers (HCPs) who manage patients with type 2 diabetes, although most patients receive evidence-based care, according to research published in the Winter issue of Clinical Diabetes.

J. Chad Williamson, of CE Outcomes in Birmingham, Ala., and colleagues surveyed 974 HCPs, including endocrinologists, family medicine physicians/primary care physicians (PCPs), internists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, certified educators, and retail- and hospital-based pharmacists to better understand existing practice patterns and educational gaps.

The researchers observed variability between HCPs in the awareness of guidelines, comfort levels with and opinions about different insulin regimens, awareness of and opinions about incretin therapy, and knowledge of appropriate reasons for referral, although most HCPs provided evidence-based care. Barriers to diabetes management included cultural barriers, language differences, and time constraints.

"The gaps identified in this study regarding the perception, knowledge, and practice of managing patients with provide ample targets for educating HCPs involved in the care of patients with this disease," the authors write. "Reviews of the latest evidence on and guideline recommendations for type 2 for the PCPs and allied HCPs are warranted, as well as reinforcement of the efficacy and safety data of available diabetes therapies."

The study was funded by Novo Nordisk. Two authors disclosed financial ties to the health care industry.

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