Spanish researchers design biomarkers for the detection of dengue and West Nile virus

February 6, 2013
This shows electrophoresis of DNA observed under ultraviolet light. Credit: Rekom Biotech - University of Granada

Researchers at the University of Granada have designed a set of biomarkers that can be used in diagnostic tests for the detection of dengue and the West Nile virus, two infectious diseases transmitted by the bite of a mosquito. These biomarkers can be used to identify these viral diseases, which affect millions of people worldwide.

The University of Granada spin-off Rekom Biotech is a biotech company composed of professionals from the private sector and from the University of Granada. Rekom Biotech is focused in the design and production of used in diagnostic tests called "recombinant antigents". These antigens are markers of a variety of diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites.

Saving Lives and Money

These products can be used in the different in vitro diagnostic platforms or systems. Specifically, the designed at the University of Granada spin off "might serve to design diagnostic tests that will help save lives and money", states the Rekom Biotech general manager, Ana Camacho Páez.

The Andalusian company also supplies other services based on the design and production of proteins and other molecular biology tools.

Currently, Rekom Biotech supplies white label recombinant antigens to two American companies, and will start supplying biological material to a German company soon. Their catalogue includes more than 50 recombinant antigens for the in vitro diagnosis of a range of infectious diseases. This company conducts its R&D activities at the Health Technology Park in Granada, Spain.

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