Postpartum anxiety more common than depression

March 4, 2013
Postpartum anxiety more common than depression
Postpartum anxiety is more common than depression in the days and months following delivery, and is associated with adverse maternal heath outcomes and reduced duration of breastfeeding, according to a study published online March 4 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Postpartum anxiety is more common than depression in the days and months following delivery, and is associated with adverse maternal heath outcomes and reduced duration of breastfeeding, according to a study published online March 4 in Pediatrics.

Ian M. Paul, M.D., from Penn State University in Hershey, and colleagues compared correlates of anxiety with correlates of depression among 1,123 mothers with "well" born ≥34 weeks' gestation. To assess health care use, breastfeeding duration, anxiety, and depression, participants were interviewed in-person during the postpartum stay and by telephone surveys at two weeks, two months, and six months. All participants planned to breastfeed.

The researchers found that, at baseline, 17 percent of participants were positive on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and 6 percent were positive on the Edinburgh Survey (EPDS). There was a significant association between primiparity and a positive STAI (20 versus 15 percent; P = 0.02), but not a positive EPDS (4 versus 7 percent; P = 0.05). Cesarean delivery, reduced duration of breastfeeding, and increased maternal, but not infant, total unplanned health care utilization within two weeks of delivery were all significantly associated with positive STAI scores. At each assessment through six months postpartum, positive STAI scores occurred more frequently than positive EPDS scores.

"Postpartum state anxiety is a common, acute phenomenon during the hospitalization that is associated with increased maternal health care utilization after discharge and reduced duration," write the authors. "State anxiety screening during the postpartum stay could improve these outcomes."

Explore further: Urinary incontinence doubles risk of postpartum depression

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Urinary incontinence doubles risk of postpartum depression

June 20, 2011
Women with urinary incontinence after giving birth are almost twice as likely to develop postpartum depression as those without incontinence, according to a new study led by Wendy Sword, a professor in McMaster University's ...

Mothers with breastfeeding difficulties more likely to suffer postpartum depression

July 19, 2011
Women who have breastfeeding difficulties in the first two weeks after giving birth are more likely to suffer postpartum depression two months later compared to women without such difficulties.

Study: Breastfeeding does not protect against MS relapses

July 6, 2011
New research finds breastfeeding doesn't appear to protect against multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, despite previous studies suggesting there may be a protective role. The research is published in the July 6, 2011, online ...

Recommended for you

At the cellular level, a child's loss of a father is associated with increased stress

July 18, 2017
The absence of a father—due to incarceration, death, separation or divorce—has adverse physical and behavioral consequences for a growing child. But little is known about the biological processes that underlie this link ...

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk

June 22, 2017
New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dailyRx
not rated yet Mar 04, 2013
Postpartum anxiety was also linked to shorter times spent breastfeeding. Fascinating. Read the whole story at dailyrx.com/postpartum-anxiety-more-common-postpartum-depression-among-moms

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.