Similar neuro outcomes in preterm infants with low-grade brain bleeding as infants with no bleeding

March 18, 2013, University Hospitals Case Medical Center

A new study from researchers at UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital and other centers suggests that preterm infants with a low-grade bleeding in the brain may have similar neurodevelopmental outcomes as infants with no bleeding. The study appears online at JAMA Pediatrics.

The study's lead author Allison Payne, MD MS, a at UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital and instructor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, said, "The results are important because it is a large multi-center study showing different results than a recent study that did find differences in outcomes at 2 years of age for babies with PIVH. Our study's results are similar to those reported by other international cohorts."

The is called periventricular-intraventricular (PIVH), a condition that can occur in . Dr. Payne and her colleagues said that although the presence of severe PIVH strongly correlates with adverse motor and , "outcomes of survivors with low-grade PIVH (grade 1 or 2) are less fully understood despite accounting for 50 percent to 80 percent of all PIVH cases."

In this study, the researchers analyzed 1472 extremely admitted to 16 pediatric medical centers, including UH and Children's Hospital, from 2006 to 2008 who survived to 18-22 months and had at least one cranial ultrasonography performed during their stay.

In total, 451 infants were diagnosed with PIVH, of which 31 percent were classified as having grade 1 PIVH, 29 percent as having grade 2, and 40 percent as having grade 3 or 4. Infants with grade 1 or 2 PIVH did not have an increased incidence of poor neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18-22 months compared with infants without PIVH, even after multivariate analysis controlling for potential confounders, including the use of antenatal and postnatal steroids.

Compared with low-grade hemorrhage, severe (grade 3 or 4) hemorrhage was significantly associated with cognitive deficits and language delay, as well as an increased risk for poor nonsensory outcomes (including cerebral palsy) apart from mild language impairment and severe cognitive impairment.

The researchers caution that high-prevalence, low-severity disabilities, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, specific neuropsychological deficits, and behavioral problems may gradually emerge over the years. "It is not clear what contribution low-grade PIVH may have to these more subtle disabilities," said Dr. Payne. She plans to continue to study these children when they reach school age.

Explore further: Surviving premature babies in Malawi continue to have poor growth rates and development delay

More information: JAMA Pediatr. 2013;():1-9. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.866 , http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1659617

Related Stories

Surviving premature babies in Malawi continue to have poor growth rates and development delay

November 8, 2011
A detailed study from Malawi, published in this week's PLoS Medicine, shows that during the first 2 years of life, infants who were born prematurely (before 37 weeks gestation) continue to have a higher risk of death than ...

Screening very preterm infants for autism at 18 months often inaccurate

May 1, 2011
Extremely premature infants who screen positive for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 18 months of age may not actually have autism. Rather, they may fail screening tests due to an unrelated cognitive or language delay, according ...

More babies survive premature birth, but serious health problems unchanged

December 4, 2012
Research published in BMJ today suggests that although more babies survived shortly after extreme preterm birth in England in 2006 compared with 1995, the number with major conditions on leaving hospital remained largely ...

New research finds slower growth of preterm infants linked to altered brain development

January 16, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Preterm infants who grow more slowly as they approached what would have been their due dates also have slower development in an area of the brain called the cerebral cortex, report Canadian researchers ...

Survival rates for premature babies in high-level NICUs are better than previously reported

July 23, 2012
Premature babies are more likely to survive when they are born in high-level neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) than in hospitals without such facilities, and this benefit is considerably larger than previously reported.

Babies born just 2 or 3 weeks early at higher risk of poor health

March 2, 2012
A research paper which demonstrates that babies born even just a few weeks early have worse health outcomes than full term babies has been published today in the British Medical Journal.

Recommended for you

NeuroNext biomarker study explores natural history of infantile-onset SMA

January 9, 2018
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to define the natural history of infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been "critical" to accelerate the development of effective therapies and hasten ...

No link between childhood lead levels, later criminality

December 27, 2017
(HealthDay)— Exposure to higher levels of lead during early childhood can affect neurological development—but does that mean affected kids are doomed to delinquency?

Early puberty in girls may take mental health toll

December 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—A girl who gets her first menstrual period early in life—possibly as young as 7—has a greater risk for developing depression and antisocial behaviors that last at least into her 20s, a new study suggests.

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase

December 21, 2017
With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University ...

Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect risk

December 15, 2017
Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Injuries from window blinds send two children to the emergency department every day

December 11, 2017
Most homes have them. They help keep our rooms warm or cold and even add a pop of color to tie the décor together. But window blinds can cause serious injuries or even death to young children. A new study from the Center ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.