Degeneration doesn't progress to discs adjacent to burst fracture

April 6, 2013
Degeneration doesn't progress to discs adjacent to burst fracture
For patients with traumatic burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine who are treated with pedicle screw fixation and direct end-plate restoration, adjacent intervertebral discs do not routinely progress to severe degeneration at 12 to 18 months post-injury, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

(HealthDay)—For patients with traumatic burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine who are treated with pedicle screw fixation and direct end-plate restoration, adjacent intervertebral discs do not routinely progress to severe degeneration at 12 to 18 months post-injury, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

Jorrit-Jan Verlaan, M.D., Ph.D., from the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a prospective trial involving 19 to examine whether adjacent to traumatic burst fractures degenerate irrevocably or survive. Participants had traumatic burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine and were treated with pedicle screw and direct end-plate restoration. Pre-operative scans were obtained and were compared with those obtained one month after surgery, and one month after screw removal, 12 to 18 months after surgery.

The researchers found that, pre-operatively, all 38 discs showed mild to moderate degeneration of the intervertebral disc. At 12 to 18 months post-trauma, five discs showed evidence of progression to severe or end-stage degeneration, while the others did not exhibit evidence of progression of degeneration.

"In summary, intervertebral discs adjacent to traumatic burst fractures do not routinely seem to progress to severe degeneration at 12 to 18 months after injury when treated with pedicle screw instrumentation and direct end-plate restoration," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the medical device industry.

Explore further: Post-laminectomy spine strength can be predicted

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Post-laminectomy spine strength can be predicted

January 17, 2013
(HealthDay)—Following lumbar laminectomy, loss of strength and shear stiffness (SS) can be predicted in the human lumbar spinal segment using measurable parameters, according to a study published in the December issue of ...

Incomplete recovery of lumbar discs two years after bed rest

June 22, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Recovery of the lumbar intervertebral discs following a 60-day period of bed rest is a lengthy process, with recovery incomplete at two years, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of Spine.

Exercise produces positive effects on the intervertebral discs

June 28, 2011
Physical exercise has a positive effect on the formation of cells in the intervertebral discs. This is shown by a study from the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, presented at the annual meeting of the International ...

Procedure aids severe, rigid scoliosis in low-weight adults

August 24, 2012
(HealthDay)—For patients with severe and rigid scoliosis and low body weight, a two-stage vertebral column resection (VCR) procedure with posterior pedicle screw instrumentation can achieve good correction of scoliosis, ...

Pattern of disc degeneration impacts low back pain

April 12, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Contiguous, multilevel disc degeneration (CMDD) is associated with increased likelihood of low back pain (LBP) and pain severity compared with skipped level disc degeneration (SLDD), according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Novel approach to track HIV infection

August 18, 2017
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a novel method of tracking HIV infection, allowing the behavior of individual virions—infectious particles—to be connected to infectivity.

Faulty gene linked to obesity in adults

August 18, 2017
Groundbreaking new research linking obesity and metabolic dysfunction to a problem in the energy generators in cells has been published by researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and The University ...

Two lung diseases killed 3.6 million in 2015: study

August 17, 2017
The two most common chronic lung diseases claimed 3.6 million lives worldwide in 2015, according to a tally published Thursday in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

New test differentiates between Lyme disease, similar illness

August 16, 2017
Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. But it can be confused with similar conditions, including Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness. A team of researchers led by Colorado ...

Addressing superbug resistance with phage therapy

August 16, 2017
International research involving a Monash biologist shows that bacteriophage therapy – a process whereby bacterial viruses attack and destroy specific strains of bacteria - can be used successfully to treat systemic, multidrug ...

Can previous exposure to west Nile alter the course of Zika?

August 15, 2017
West Nile virus is no stranger to the U.S.-Mexico border; thousands of people in the region have contracted the mosquito-borne virus in the past. But could this previous exposure affect how intensely Zika sickens someone ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.