Autism scientists seek more brains to aid research

May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Tanner

(AP)—Autism scientists are seeking more brain samples for research.

They announced Thursday a new network collecting brain specimens around the country. They say the more they get, the better the chances of finding better ways to treat the .

So far the network has four sites: Mount Sinai medical school in New York, the University of California in Davis, the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas, and McLean Hospital near Boston.

A freezer malfunction damaged many of that Harvard-affiliated hospital's specimens. Neuroscientist Robert Ring of the Autism Speaks says the network was planned before that.

Ring says the network has more than 6,000 people signed up to be donors after death. Brains from people with and without are needed.

Explore further: Freezer damages brain samples used to study autism

More information: Autism tissue program: www.autismtissueprogram.org

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