Penicillin prevents return of leg infection called cellulitis

Penicillin prevents return of leg infection called cellulitis: study
However, the painful infection comes back once drug is stopped, researchers say.

(HealthDay)—For people who have suffered from cellulitis of the leg, a long course of low-dose penicillin prevents the painful infection from returning, British researchers report.

Once the is stopped, however, its protective effect diminishes and the condition can flare up again, the researchers noted.

"Low-dose penicillin substantially reduces the risk of further episodes of leg cellulitis in those who have had two or more previous episodes," said lead researcher Hywel Williams, a professor of dermato- at the University of Nottingham.

"The penicillin reduced recurrences from 37 percent in the group taking placebo to 22 percent in those taking penicillin," Williams said. "But this effect only occurred in the period that folks took the penicillin. When they stopped the 12 months of penicillin, the protective effect wore off."

Cellulitis is a common infection of the skin and deep underlying tissues. The two most common causes are Staphylococcus (staph) and group A strep. The bacteria enter the body through an injury such as a bruise, burn, surgical cut or wound, as well as through athlete's foot.

Symptoms can include fever and chills, swollen glands or , and a rash with painful, red, tender skin. In addition, the skin may blister and over.

The usual treatment is , but the condition commonly returns when treatment is stopped.

Doctors and their patients now have reliable information on a possible way of reducing recurrences of this disabling and painful , Williams said.

"We now know for the first time that low-dose penicillin works, but we don't know how long it should be taken for and whether giving long-term antibiotics may cause resistance problems in the community in the long term, or whether it should be given for people with a first episode of cellulitis or just those with two or more previous episodes," he said.

The report was published in the May 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

One expert doesn't think this treatment is anything new.

"I know keeping you on antibiotics will prevent cellulitis from recurring," said Dr. Michele Green, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City. "The problem is that the diminishes once drug therapy is stopped.

"This is what I do with older people. I keep them on antibiotics for a longer period of time so that they don't have a problem, but once you take them off they're just as vulnerable as they were before," Green said. "That's just common sense."

In addition, Green worries that keeping people on antibiotics for extended periods helps build the bacteria's resistance to the drug.

For the new study, Williams' team randomly assigned 274 people who had suffered from cellulitis of the leg that had been treated to one year of treatment with low-dose penicillin or placebos.

Over three years of follow-up, people taking penicillin saw a recurrence of cellulitis 626 days after the drug was stopped, compared with 532 days for those in the placebo group, the researchers found.

While on penicillin, 30 people had a recurrence of cellulitis, compared with 51 patients taking the placebo, they found.


Explore further

New strep throat guidelines tackle antibiotic resistance

More information: To find out more about cellulitis, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Journal information: New England Journal of Medicine

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: Penicillin prevents return of leg infection called cellulitis (2013, May 2) retrieved 22 July 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-penicillin-leg-infection-cellulitis.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more