Breast implant scare: One in four found flawed

June 25, 2013

Doctors in France have removed PIP breast implants from more than 16,000 women and found a quarter of the scandal-tainted products had signs of splitting or leakage, a watchdog said on Tuesday.

A total of 16,426 women have had the implants removed since investigators found the devices were twice as likely to rupture as rival brands, and that French manufacturer PIP used industrial silicone to fill them, the National Medicines Safety Agency (ANSM) said.

Of the 28,276 implants that have been removed, 7,186, or 25.4 percent, were defective, it said.

Of these, 4,406 showed signs of splitting in the implants' , and in 1,976 others, illegal gel was "sweating" through it, the agency said.

The ANSM's figures apply only to France. An estimated 300,000 women in 65 countries are believed to have received the implants; some 30,000 of them in France.

News of the faulty implants in 2011 sparked fears worldwide, but health officials in various countries have said the prosthetics were not toxic and did not increase the risk of .

The ANSM said on Tuesday that it had found 70 cases of breast cancer among women with , "but the detected tumours are not associated" with the devices.

PIP founder Jean-Claude Mas, 73, has been charged with manslaughter and fraud. PIP's implants have been banned and the company, located near Marseille, southern France, has been wound up.

Explore further: Some 8,000 French women have faulty breast implants removed

Related Stories

Some 8,000 French women have faulty breast implants removed

June 4, 2012
French health authorities said Monday that nearly 8,000 French women had followed a government recommendation to have faulty breast implants that sparked a global health scare removed.

Prosecutor urges 4-year sentence for faulty breast implants

May 14, 2013
A French prosecutor on Tuesday called for the founder of a firm whose faulty breast implants sparked a global health scare to be given a four-year prison sentence on fraud charges.

Faulty PIP breast implants not toxic: British authorities

June 18, 2012
Faulty breast implants made by PIP, the French company that sparked a global health scare, do not pose any long-term medical threats, British health authorities said in a final report Monday.

German firm on trial over faulty French breast implants

March 22, 2013
Proceedings against a German safety standards firm that gave defective breast implants the all clear kicked off Friday in France, with millions of euros claimed in damages.

Belgium advises women to have PIP breast implants removed

February 1, 2012
Belgium's health authorities on Wednesday advised women with defective breast implants made by French firm PIP to have them removed.

Dutch women reimbursed for breast implant removals

January 26, 2012
Dutch women wanting to replace potentially defective breast implants made by now-defunct French company PIP will be paid back in full, the Dutch health insurance federation said Thursday.

Recommended for you

World's first child hand transplant a 'success'

July 19, 2017
The first child in the world to undergo a double hand transplant is now able to write, feed and dress himself, doctors said Tuesday, declaring the ground-breaking operation a success after 18 months.

Knee surgery—have we been doing it wrong?

July 18, 2017
A team of University at Buffalo medical doctors have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery.

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vessels

July 17, 2017
The liver is a particularly squishy, slippery organ, prone to shifting both deadly tumors and life-preserving blood vessels by inches between the time they're discovered on a CT scan and when the patient is lying on an operating ...

Researchers discover indicator of lung transplant rejection

July 13, 2017
Research by scientists at Dignity Health St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center's Norton Thoracic Institute was published in the July 12, 2017 issue of Science Translational Medicine titled "Zbtb7a induction in alveolar ...

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

July 7, 2017
Like many surgeons, Dr. Jason Spector is often faced with the challenge of securely closing the abdominal wall without injuring the intestines. If the process goes awry, there can be serious consequences for patients, including ...

Success with first 20 patients undergoing minimally invasive pancreatic transplant surgery

June 29, 2017
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that their first series of a minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic pancreas disease, known as severe pancreatitis, resulted in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.