Exercise improves metabolic syndrome post-menopause

June 13, 2013
Exercise improves metabolic syndrome post-menopause
Exercise training is associated with improvements in components of metabolic syndrome among postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—Exercise training is associated with improvements in components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Conrad P. Earnest, Ph.D., from the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, and colleagues compared the effects of six months of at 50 percent, 100 percent, and 150 percent of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Recommendations for physical activity (4, 8, and 12 kcal/kg of energy expenditure/week [KKW]) versus a nonexercise control group on MetS in a cohort of sedentary, overweight, moderately hypertensive, postmenopausal women.

The researchers identified significant improvements in the summed z-scores for the National Cholesterol Education Program MetS components expressed as a continuous variable (zMetS) for all , while the 8 and 12 KKW groups only correlated with significant improvements in MetS. In post-hoc analyses, compared with the control group, 12 KKW correlated with a significant improvement in zMetS and 8 and 12 KKW correlated with significant improvements for MetS. There were significant trends for improvement in (for 4, 8, and 12 KKW), fasting glucose (for 8 and 12 KKW), and systolic blood pressure (for the 12 KKW group).

"Our results suggest that low-to- cardiorespiratory exercise appears to improve components of the MetS in postmenopausal women at levels at or greater than NIH recommendations and that zMetS improves at half the NIH recommendations," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical, fitness, and nutrition industries.

Explore further: Fatty liver may directly mediate CAD in metabolic syndrome

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Fatty liver may directly mediate CAD in metabolic syndrome

January 23, 2013
(HealthDay)—Men and women with fatty liver are more likely to have metabolic syndrome (MetS) with type 2 diabetes, and women with fatty liver are more likely to have MetS with subclinical atherosclerosis, according to research ...

Metabolic syndrome linked to arterial stiffness in CKD

June 4, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), those with metabolic syndrome (MetS) have increased arterial stiffness but no increase in endothelial dysfunction, compared to those without MetS, according to ...

Half the recommended exercise can cut risk of serious illness

May 8, 2013
Doing just half the amount of recommended exercise can be enough to reduce the risk of serious illness, research from the Department for Health have found.

Physical exercise in the fight against osteoporosis

May 6, 2013
Montserrat Otero, PhD holder in Physical Activity and Sports Sciences of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, has designed a physical exercise programme which is based on very basic, rudimentary materials and which ...

Medical expenses for men with metabolic syndrome higher than those for women, study finds

October 19, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Men with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a condition which often leads to cardiovascular, cerebrovascular disease or diabetes, are more likely to incur greater health care costs than women with similar conditions, ...

Recommended for you

Resolvin D-1 limits kidney damage after heart attacks

February 20, 2018
A heart attack triggers an acute inflammatory response at the damaged portion of the heart's left ventricle. If this acute inflammation lingers, it can lead to stretching of the ventricle and heart failure. The inflammation ...

Stroke drug demonstrates safety in clinical trial

February 20, 2018
A preliminary Phase 2 clinical trial has demonstrated that patients with acute ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke, can safely tolerate high doses of 3K3A-APC, a promising anti-stroke drug invented at The Scripps ...

Women once considered low risk for heart disease show evidence of previous heart attack scars

February 20, 2018
Women who complain about chest pain often are reassured by their doctors that there is no reason to worry because their angiograms show that the women don't have blockages in the major heart arteries, a primary cause of heart ...

Can your cardiac device be hacked?

February 20, 2018
Medical devices, including cardiovascular implantable electronic devices could be at risk for hacking. In a paper publishing online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Cardiology's ...

A drug long used to treat gout may help adult heart failure patients

February 20, 2018
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have shown that probenecid, a drug long used to treat gout, may be able to improve heart function in adult patients who experience heart failure.

Number of obese years not—just obesity—a distinct risk factor for heart damage

February 20, 2018
In an analysis of clinical data collected on more than 9,000 people, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that the number of years spent overweight or obese appear to "add up" to a distinct risk factor that makes those with ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.