Shared-care model improves professional satisfaction

June 6, 2013

Shared-care model improves professional satisfaction
Shifting primary care practice toward a shared-care model for work distribution and responsibility can improve professional satisfaction, according to research published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.
(HealthDay)—Shifting primary care practice toward a shared-care model for work distribution and responsibility can improve professional satisfaction, according to research published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Christine A. Sinsky, M.D., from Medical Associates Clinic and in Dubuque, Iowa, and colleagues made site visits to 23 high-performing primary care practices to investigate how these practices distribute functions among the team, use technology to their advantage, improve outcomes with data, and make the job of primary care feasible and enjoyable as a life's vocation.

The researchers identified innovations that can increase practice joy and mitigate physician burnout, including proactive planned care, with pre-visit planning and pre-visit ; sharing clinical care among a team, with expanded rooming protocols, standing orders, and panel management; sharing clerical tasks with collaborative documentation (scribing), non-physician order entry, and streamlined prescription management; improving communication by verbal messaging and in-box management; and improving team functioning through co-location, team meetings, and work flow mapping.

"Our observations suggest that a shift from a physician-centric model of work distribution and responsibility to a shared-, with a higher level of clinical support staff per physician and frequent forums for communication, can result in high-functioning teams, improved professional satisfaction, and greater joy in practice," the authors write.

Explore further: Can team-based care improve primary care delivery and patient outcomes?

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Can team-based care improve primary care delivery and patient outcomes?

April 22, 2013
In a team-based care approach, a diverse group of clinicians shares responsibility for a panel of patients and consults with each other regularly. This model of delivering primary care can improve patient care, practice workflows, ...

Support players needed to improve primary care delivery

January 25, 2013
(HealthDay)—Practice facilitators and care managers can play important roles in improving delivery of primary care, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Collaborative care teams improve mental health outcomes

October 17, 2012
Collaborative care, a model that involves multiple clinicians working with a patient, significantly improves depression and anxiety outcomes compared to standard primary care treatment for up to two years, finds a new review ...

One-third of physician assistants work in primary care

February 1, 2013
(HealthDay)—Roughly one-third of physician assistants (PAs) choose to work in primary care, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

New blood-thinner measures may cut medication errors

May 22, 2013
Blood thinners are the preferred treatment option to prevent heart attacks, blood clots and stroke, but they are not without risk, and not just because of their side effects. These high-risk drugs, known as anticoagulants, ...

Guided care provides better quality of care for chronically ill older adults

January 17, 2013
Patients who received Guided Care, a comprehensive form of primary care for older adults with chronic health problems, rated the quality of their care much higher than patients in regular primary care, and used less home ...

Recommended for you

A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep—and your partner's, study finds

December 14, 2018
Rudeness. Sarcastic comments. Demeaning language. Interrupting or talking over someone in a meeting. Workplace incivilities such as these are becoming increasingly common, and a new study from Portland State University and ...

A holiday gift to primary care doctors: Proof of their time crunch

December 14, 2018
The average primary care doctor needs to work six more hours a day than they already do, in order to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early-detection care they want and deserve, a new study finds.

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find

December 12, 2018
When Seattle Public Schools announced that it would reorganize school start times across the district for the fall of 2016, the massive undertaking took more than a year to deploy. Elementary schools started earlier, while ...

Large restaurant portions a global problem, study finds

December 12, 2018
A new multi-country study finds that large, high-calorie portion sizes in fast food and full service restaurants is not a problem unique to the United States. An international team of researchers found that 94 percent of ...

Receiving genetic information can change risk

December 11, 2018
Millions of people in the United States alone have submitted their DNA for analysis and received information that not only predicts their risk for disease but, it turns out, in some cases might also have influenced that risk, ...

Yes please to yoghurt and cheese: The new improved Mediterranean diet

December 11, 2018
Thousands of Australians can take heart as new research from the University of South Australia shows a dairy-enhanced Mediterranean diet will significantly increase health outcomes for those at risk of cardiovascular disease ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.