Strong public support for school-based immunisation

June 20, 2013, University of Adelaide

South Australians believe that a school-based immunisation program is the best way to vaccinate teenagers, according to new research from the University of Adelaide.

The study, published in this month's issue of the journal Vaccine, was aimed at better understanding attitudes towards school-based immunisation programs compared with the family GP, council clinics and other programs and centres.

The project sought the views of South Australian adults and involved researchers from the Robinson Institute, the Schools of Paediatrics and and at the University of Adelaide, SA Health, the SA Department for Education and , and the University of Sydney.

Of more than 1800 adults interviewed, 76% regarded schools as the best place for adolescents to receive their immunisations. Support for school-based immunisation was strongest among parents of children currently at high school, with 88% saying school is the best place for their teens to be vaccinated.

High school-based immunisation programs have been in place in Australia since the 1970s. In 2007, Australia became the first country in the world to introduce an annual in high schools for (HPV), which is passed through and can lead to cancers and other disease. This year, the program was extended to include boys as well as girls.

"Public support is critical to the ongoing success of school-based immunisation programs," says Associate Professor Helen Marshall, from the University's Robinson Institute and Director of the and Immunology Research Trials Unit at the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide.

"Because these programs are implemented through collaboration between the Commonwealth and the States and Territories, the programs rely on acceptance at many levels - from the community, parents, students, schools, the health and education sectors, and many layers of government."

Associate Professor Marshall says the main reasons given for supporting school-based immunisation included: convenience of vaccination during school hours, no need for prescriptions, no need to pay for the vaccination, and no need for the parent to leave work to attend a doctor's appointment with their child.

"School-based programs achieve a higher rate of vaccination among adolescents than any other program for that age group around the world," Associate Professor Marshall says.

"School-based programs also have the advantage of providing immunisations to children from our most disadvantaged backgrounds, who might otherwise not visit their local GP. This is especially important for the HPV vaccine, as those from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to regularly participate in cervical screening programs."

Explore further: Community-based programs may help prevent childhood obesity

More information: www.sciencedirect.com/science/ … ii/S0264410X13005331

Related Stories

Community-based programs may help prevent childhood obesity

June 17, 2013
When it comes to confronting childhood obesity, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health conclude that community-based approaches are important. A systematic review of childhood obesity prevention ...

Most parents believe vaccines are safe for children, research finds

February 27, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—New research from the University of Adelaide shows that 95% of parents believe vaccines are safe for their children despite the spread of misinformation about vaccine safety.

50 percent of Australians who oppose vaccination get their information from the Internet

May 23, 2013
To coincide with the broadcast of Jabbed: Love, Fear and Vaccines (SBS ONE, Sunday 26 May at 8.30pm) the first ever national survey on Australian attitudes to vaccination reveals surprising statistics including half of Australians ...

Chicken pox vaccine saving children's lives

March 13, 2013
The widespread introduction of a chicken pox vaccine in Australia in 2006 has prevented thousands of children from being hospitalised with severe chicken pox and saved lives, according to new research.

School-located vaccination programs could reduce flu cases and deaths among children

June 5, 2013
Offering flu vaccines at elementary schools could expand vaccination rates and reduce costs, according to a new study reported in the scientific journal Vaccine by researchers from UC Davis Health System; the Monroe County, ...

New study explores providers' perceptions of parental concerns about HPV vaccination

May 14, 2013
A new Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) study has found that low-income and minority parents may be more receptive to vaccinating their daughters against Human Papillomavirus (HPV), while white, middle-class parents ...

Recommended for you

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.