Health-care system factors may have less influence on kidney-related racial disparities

July 11, 2013

Among patients with kidney disease who received specialized pre-dialysis care in a universal healthcare system, blacks experienced faster disease progression than whites, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). The findings suggest that healthcare system factors have less influence on black-white disparities in kidney function decline than other factors.

Research shows that blacks are more prone to develop than whites. The disparity likely involves a complex interaction of biological, societal, and healthcare system factors. In the United States, blacks often have less access to healthcare and decreased quality of care compared with whites. But in The Netherlands, patients have equal access to care due to the country's universal healthcare system, making it less likely that healthcare system factors would play a role in related to kidney failure.

To study kidney failure disparities in such a setting, Tessa van den Beukel, MD, PhD, Moniek de Goeij, MSc (Leiden University Medical Center, in The Netherlands) and their colleagues analyzed data on nearly 1000 black and white patients starting specialized pre- in The Netherlands.

The researchers found that black patients experienced a faster progression to kidney failure than whites. The faster decline in among black compared with white patients was predominantly present in patients with diabetes and in patients who excreted greater amounts of protein in their urine (an indication of more advanced ). This suggests that diabetes may lead to more extensive damage of the kidneys in blacks compared with whites, causing a faster decline in kidney function.

"Since our study was performed in a universal healthcare setting, it is likely that healthcare system factors have a less influential role in explaining the black-white difference in rates of kidney function decline," said Dr. van den Beukel. "Consequently, ethnicity/race is an important factor that should be taken into account in medical care. For example, our results may indicate that black patients with chronic kidney disease should be referred to pre-dialysis care earlier than white patients to assure timely preparation for renal replacement therapy," said de Goeij.

Explore further: Hispanics live longest, whites shortest among dialysis patients

More information: The article, entitled "Differences in Progression to ESRD Between Black and White Patients Receiving Predialysis Care in a Universal Healthcare System," will appear online on July 11, 2013, doi: 10.2215/10761012.

Related Stories

Hispanics live longest, whites shortest among dialysis patients

March 28, 2013
Among kidney failure patients on dialysis, Hispanics tend to live the longest and Whites the shortest, with Blacks' survival time in between these two, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal ...

Racial disparities exist in end-of-life care for US dialysis patients

April 11, 2013
At the end of life, black patients with kidney failure receiving chronic dialysis are less likely to be referred to hospice and to discontinue dialysis compared with white patients, according to a study appearing in an upcoming ...

Factors linked with survival differences between Black, White kidney failure patients

January 17, 2013
Complex socioeconomic and residential factors may account for differences in survival between Black and White kidney failure patients, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society ...

Race, geographic location may affect care of patients with kidney disease

March 14, 2013
Race and geographic area play important roles in determining whether a patient with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receives optimal care before developing kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue ...

Transplantation issues: Kidney donors and children in need of transplants

November 2, 2012
Three studies presented during the American Society of Nephrology's Annual Kidney Week provide new information related to kidney transplantation—specifically, the post-transplant health of kidney donors and the racial disparities ...

Education for kidney failure patients may improve chances living donor transplantation

March 21, 2013
Patients with kidney failure who have greater transplant knowledge and motivation are ultimately more likely to receive a kidney transplant from a living donor, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical ...

Recommended for you

Google searches can be used to track dengue in underdeveloped countries

July 20, 2017
An analytical tool that combines Google search data with government-provided clinical data can quickly and accurately track dengue fever in less-developed countries, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

July 19, 2017
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged long before the introduction of the antibiotic methicillin into clinical practice, according to a study published in the open access journal Genome Biology. It was ...

New test distinguishes Zika from similar viral infections

July 18, 2017
A new test is the best-to-date in differentiating Zika virus infections from infections caused by similar viruses. The antibody-based assay, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and Humabs BioMed, a private biotechnology ...

'Superbugs' study reveals complex picture of E. coli bloodstream infections

July 18, 2017
The first large-scale genetic study of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultured from patients with bloodstream infections in England showed that drug resistant 'superbugs' are not always out-competing other strains. Research by ...

Ebola virus can persist in monkeys that survived disease, even after symptoms disappear

July 17, 2017
Ebola virus infection can be detected in rhesus monkeys that survive the disease and no longer show symptoms, according to research published by Army scientists in today's online edition of the journal Nature Microbiology. ...

Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humans

July 13, 2017
Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have detected a herpes virus in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans, according to a study published today in the journal Scientific ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.