No change in HPV vaccine coverage for teen girls in 2012

July 30, 2013
No change in HPV vaccine coverage for teen girls in 2012
In 2012 there was little increase in human papillomavirus vaccination among teenage girls, according to a report published in the July 26 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

(HealthDay)—In 2012 there was little increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teenage girls, according to a report published in the July 26 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Shannon Stokley, M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the 2007 to 2012 National Immunization Survey-Teen and national post-licensure vaccine safety monitoring to summarize the national HPV vaccination coverage levels among adolescent girls aged 13 to 17 years.

According to the report, from 2007 to 2011, there was an increase in vaccination coverage with one or more dose of any HPV vaccine, from 25.1 to 53.0 percent; however, there was little change from 2011 to 2012 (53.8 percent in 2012). Vaccine coverage for one or more doses could have reached 92.6 percent if the vaccine had been given during a health care visit where another vaccine was administered. Based on evidence from safety monitoring data, HPV4 appears to be safe.

"Despite the availability of safe and effective HPV vaccines, approximately one-quarter of surveyed parents did not intend to vaccinate their daughters in the next 12 months. Missed vaccination opportunities remain high," write the authors of an editorial note. "Improving practice patterns and clinical skills so that are well equipped to address questions from parents and are committed to using every opportunity to strongly recommend HPV vaccination is necessary to achieve potential reductions in HPV-attributable cancers."

Explore further: Too few girls get HPV vaccine against cancer: CDC

More information: Full Text

Related Stories

Too few girls get HPV vaccine against cancer: CDC

August 30, 2012
(HealthDay)—Parents and doctors can do more to protect girls from cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), say U.S. health officials who are concerned by lagging HPV vaccination rates among females.

Report: Teen HPV vaccination rate still lagging

July 25, 2013
(AP)—Disappointed health officials say only about half of teenage girls have gotten a controversial vaccine against cervical cancer—a rate that's changed little in three years.

Vaccinating boys plays key role in HPV prevention

July 22, 2013
Improving vaccination rates against the human papillomavirus (HPV) in boys is key to protecting both men and women, says new research from University of Toronto Professor Peter A. Newman from the Factor-Inwentash Faculty ...

HPV vaccination does not lead to an increase in sex

October 10, 2012
A study published in Vaccine reveals that contrary to recent discussions, the HPV vaccination does not increase sexual activity in adolescent girls.

More parents say they won't vaccinate daughters against HPV, researchers find

March 18, 2013
A rising percentage of parents say they won't have their teen daughters vaccinated to protect against the human papilloma virus, even though physicians are increasingly recommending adolescent vaccinations, a study by Mayo ...

HPV-associated cancer incidence rates point to needed efforts to increase HPV vaccination coverage

January 7, 2013
Despite the decline in cancer death rates in the U.S., there is an increase in incidence rates for cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and more efforts are needed to increase HPV vaccination coverage ...

Recommended for you

No dye: Cancer patients' gray hair darkened on immune drugs

July 21, 2017
Cancer patients' gray hair unexpectedly turned youthfully dark while taking novel drugs, and it has doctors scratching their heads.

Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers

July 20, 2017
Virtually all cancer treatments used today also damage normal cells, causing the toxic side effects associated with cancer treatment. A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center ...

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes

July 20, 2017
Several known factors are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer including increasing age, being overweight after menopause, alcohol intake, and family history. However, the underlying biologic mechanisms through ...

Immune-cell numbers predict response to combination immunotherapy in melanoma

July 20, 2017
Whether a melanoma patient will better respond to a single immunotherapy drug or two in combination depends on the abundance of certain white blood cells within their tumors, according to a new study conducted by UC San Francisco ...

Discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

July 19, 2017
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which ...

Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumors

July 19, 2017
The most comprehensive analysis yet of medulloblastoma has identified genomic changes responsible for more than 75 percent of the brain tumors, including two new suspected cancer genes that were found exclusively in the least ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.