Technology takes on breast cancer

July 17, 2013, Australian National University
Technology takes on breast cancer

(Medical Xpress)—An ANU student has developed a smartphone app for the early detection of breast cancer.

Software engineering undergraduate Sanjay Sreekumar designed the app for organisation The Young Adults Program.

"There's a big potential for apps to provide a proactive means of detecting illnesses," Mr Sreekumar said.

"This is not something that just targets specific people. It can affect everyone regardless of age and gender."

"I always feel sympathetic when I hear stories about people suffering from cancer. This is something I can do."

The YAP app is designed to allow individuals to self-monitor for early signs of breast cancer. By providing monthly inputs of breast irregularities, the application can help identify if further is required.

Mr Sreekumar is currently working on improving the app by adding visual aids and multiple languages. He wants to get the word out to organisations and promote the app internationally.

Following the success of this app he hopes to extend his skills to other health areas.

"The core of YAP is providing an additional means of examination to save lives," he said.

"It could apply to many illnesses. I want to see this technology being used world-wide."

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