Study finds beer industry's self-regulation ineffective at preventing advertising code violations

August 19, 2013 by Chris Defrancesco
Credit: Kzenon/Shutterstock Photo

In an evaluation of beer advertising code regulations aimed to encourage responsible advertising practices, new research from the American Journal of Public Health finds that content violations still occur and the current U.S. Beer Institute's self-regulation process may be ineffective.

Led by Thomas Babor, professor and Physicians' Health Services Endowed Chair in Community Medicine and Public Health at the UConn School of Medicine, researchers reviewed all alcohol advertisements that aired during the men's and women's NCAA basketball tournament games from 1999 to 2008. Current is self-regulated by the in which the U.S. Beer Institute develops, updates and enforces the regulation codes. This study employed academic and professionals to rate the ads using both the 1997 and 2006 versions of the U.S. Beer Institute's guidelines.

Results showed that when experts reviewed the advertisements, code violations were prevalent. Between 35 percent and 74 percent of the ads had violations, depending on the version of regulation codes used and the scoring method applied. Furthermore, ads with content violations were broadcast more often than those without. Ads that violated the codes most often included content that appealed to young people and content in which drinking was associated with social success and .

"The findings of this study are consistent with evidence from other research showing that alcohol industry self-regulation programs are ineffective at preventing content violations," Babor says. "Unless the alcohol industry insists on the use of standardized rating procedure by trained panels consisting of public health experts and members of vulnerable groups, it is unlikely that the high prevalence of content violations will be reduced."

The video will load shortly

Donna Damon, a research assistant in the Department of Community Medicine and Health Care, managed the study.

"An Empirical Evaluation of the U.S. Beer Institute's Self-Regulation Code Governing the Content of Beer Advertising" is scheduled to appear in the October 2013 print issue of the American Journal of Public Health, published by the American Public Health Association.

Explore further: Beer-industry advertising guidelines: Rating panels may help industry assess itself

More information: ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/ … 105/AJPH.2013.301487

Related Stories

Beer-industry advertising guidelines: Rating panels may help industry assess itself

May 17, 2013
In order to avoid exposing vulnerable groups such as children and young adults to alcohol advertising, industry groups have developed their own self-regulation guidelines. However, these guidelines have been criticized for ...

Alcohol advertising standards violations most common in magazines with youthful audiences

August 8, 2012
The content of alcohol ads placed in magazines is more likely to be in violation of industry guidelines if the ad appears in a magazine with sizable youth readership, according to a new study from the Center on Alcohol Marketing ...

Young beer drinkers binge drink more frequently, study finds

August 12, 2013
Just under a third of young Swiss men prefer beer when they drink alcohol, taking in at least two thirds of their alcohol consumption in the form of the beverage. Far fewer (around five percent) prefer wine. Is there an association ...

Pilot study finds ER patients drinking high-octane beer

August 14, 2013
Budweiser, Steel Reserve, Colt 45, Bud Ice and Bud Light – were consumed in the highest quantities by emergency room patients, according to a new pilot study from researchers at The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth ...

Do TV liquor ads drive kids to drink?

January 28, 2013
(HealthDay)—Seeing beer and liquor ads on TV may promote drinking as early as seventh grade and lead to alcohol-related problems just a few years later, a new study suggests.

Recommended for you

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Shootist
1 / 5 (5) Aug 19, 2013
Advertising is speech. Screw the government regulators and their "code violations".

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.