Inclusion of ABI may better identify vascular disease

September 12, 2013
Inclusion of ABI may better identify vascular disease
Inclusion of the ankle/brachial index may better identify vascular disease in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—Inclusion of the ankle/brachial index (ABI) may better identify vascular disease in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), according to a study published online Aug. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Francesco Violi, M.D., from the Sapienza University Of Rome, and colleagues enrolled consecutive adult patients with NVAF referred to internal medicine wards (October 2010 through October 2012) who had ABI measurements. Patients with acquired or congenital valvular AF, active cancer, disease with life expectancy less than three years, hyperthyroidism, and pregnancy were excluded.

The researchers found that, of the 2,027 NVAF patients included in the study, 83 percent had hypertension, 23 percent had diabetes mellitus, 39 percent had , 29 percent had , and 15 percent smoked. Additionally, at least one atherosclerotic risk factor was detected in 90 percent of patients. Despite being at high risk for stroke, 16 percent were untreated with any antithrombotic drug, 19 percent were treated with , 61 percent were treated with oral anticoagulants, and 4 percent were treated with both antiplatelet drugs and oral anticoagulants. Just over one-fifth (21 percent) had ABI ?0.90, indicating that NVAF is often associated with systemic atherosclerosis. Inclusion of ABI ?0.90 in the CHA2DS2-VASc score allowed for better identification of the risk profile, with an up-grading of the in each score category.

"This study provides the first evidence that one-fifth of NVAF patients had an ABI ?0.90, indicating that it may represent a simple and cheap method to better define the prevalence of vascular disease in NVAF," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: CHADS2 risk score assigns over one-third of stroke patients to low or intermediate stroke risk

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

CHADS2 risk score assigns over one-third of stroke patients to low or intermediate stroke risk

September 1, 2013
The CHADS2 stroke risk scores 0 or 1 assign more than one-third of patients in atrial fibrillation with stroke to low or intermediate risk not mandating oral anticoagulation, according to research presented at ESC Congress ...

USPSTF: evidence lacking for ankle brachial index screening

September 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has found that there is currently insufficient evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of use of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) for screening for peripheral ...

GPs undertreat women with AF

September 1, 2013
General practitioners (GPs) undertreat women with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr Pierre Sabouret from France. The analysis of more than 15,000 patients showed that ...

Anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary stent implantation

September 2, 2013
A new article in the September 2013 issue of Thrombosis and Haemostasis strives to shed light on the optimal antithrombotic strategy in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation who undergo coronary stent implantation. ...

Impact of AF on stroke risk eliminated with multiple risk factors

September 1, 2013
Patients with five or more risk factors have the same stroke risk as patients with atrial fibrillation, according to research presented at the ESC Congress today by Dr. Christine Benn Christiansen from Denmark. The study ...

Researchers develop way for physicians to determine risk in chronic heart disease patients

September 10, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Physicians who treat heart disease patients often wonder how to determine if their patients are at risk of another heart attack or stroke. Now, University of Florida researchers and their colleagues have ...

Recommended for you

A nanoparticle inhalant for treating heart disease

January 18, 2018
A team of researchers from Italy and Germany has developed a nanoparticle inhalant for treating people suffering from heart disease. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes ...

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair

January 10, 2018
Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury - and getting them to stay there - remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal ...

Two simple tests could help to pinpoint cause of stroke

January 10, 2018
Detecting the cause of the deadliest form of stroke could be improved by a simple blood test added alongside a routine brain scan, research suggests.

Exercise is good for the heart, high blood pressure is bad—researchers find out why

January 10, 2018
When the heart is put under stress during exercise, it is considered healthy. Yet stress due to high blood pressure is bad for the heart. Why? And is this always the case? Researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular ...

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

January 10, 2018
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.