Intervention for NICU moms reduces their trauma, anxiety

September 5, 2013
Intervention for NICU moms reduces their trauma, anxiety
An intervention aimed at reducing parental trauma and redefining the parental experience for those with very premature newborns is both feasible and cost-effective, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—An intervention aimed at reducing parental trauma and redefining the parental experience for those with very premature newborns is both feasible and cost-effective, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

Richard J. Shaw, M.D., from Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and colleagues randomized 105 mothers of preterm infants (25 to 34 weeks' gestational age; >600 g) to receive a six-session intervention (62 participants) or to an active comparison group (43 participants). The intervention targeted parental trauma and facilitated infant redefinition (the process of changing the mother's of her infant and the parenting experience). The intervention involved psychoeducation, , progressive muscle relaxation, and development of their trauma narrative.

The researchers found that, compared to the comparison group, mothers in the intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in both and depression. There were significant improvements in anxiety, with no differences between groups. Mothers with higher ratings of baseline neonatal intensive care unit stress benefited more from the intervention compared with mothers who had lower ratings, according to moderator analysis (P = 0.036).

"Given that improvements in mothers' distress may lead to improved infant outcomes, this intervention has the potential for a high public health impact," the authors write.

Explore further: Intervention helps mothers of children diagnosed with cancer

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Intervention helps mothers of children diagnosed with cancer

January 31, 2013
(HealthDay)—Compared with a nondirective support intervention, mothers of children recently diagnosed with cancer who participate in the Bright IDEAS problem-solving skills training (PSST) intervention experience beneficial ...

At-home care cuts depression in older African-Americans

August 20, 2013
(HealthDay)—A home-based intervention delivered by social workers reduces symptoms and improves quality of life in older African-Americans with depressive symptoms, according to research published in the Aug. 20 issue of ...

Women who suffered severe sexual trauma as kids benefit most from intervention

July 15, 2013
A UCLA-led study of HIV-positive women who were sexually abused as children has found that the more severe their past trauma, the greater their improvement in an intervention program designed to ease their psychological suffering.

Intervention can prevent PPD in adolescents

April 30, 2013
By targeting the factors that may play a significant role in the development of postpartum depression (PPD) in adolescent mothers, researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island believe they have found a way to prevent ...

Infection during newborn's first week of life associated with bacterial infection in the mother

August 20, 2013
Early-onset neonatal infection, defined as infection in the first 7 days of life, is associated with maternal infection and colonization, a systematic review and meta-analysis by Grace Chan (Johns Hopkins School of Public ...

Specialist care helps develop relationship between mothers with severe mental illness and their newborn children

June 27, 2013
For mothers who are suffering from severe mental illness, interactions with babies significantly improve following specialist video-feedback and treatment on an inpatient Mother and Baby Unit (MBU), according to a new study ...

Recommended for you

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

NeuroNext biomarker study explores natural history of infantile-onset SMA

January 9, 2018
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to define the natural history of infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been "critical" to accelerate the development of effective therapies and hasten ...

No link between childhood lead levels, later criminality

December 27, 2017
(HealthDay)— Exposure to higher levels of lead during early childhood can affect neurological development—but does that mean affected kids are doomed to delinquency?

Early puberty in girls may take mental health toll

December 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—A girl who gets her first menstrual period early in life—possibly as young as 7—has a greater risk for developing depression and antisocial behaviors that last at least into her 20s, a new study suggests.

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase

December 21, 2017
With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University ...

Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect risk

December 15, 2017
Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.