Rarely 'too early' for appearance-enhancing procedures

September 19, 2013
Rarely 'Too early' for appearance-enhancing procedures
The effects of appearance-enhancing procedures such as neuromodulators, fillers, and light or laser treatments have lasting effects and can rarely be used "too early," according to a viewpoint piece published online Sept. 18 in JAMA Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—The effects of appearance-enhancing procedures such as neuromodulators, fillers, and light or laser treatments have lasting effects and can rarely be used "too early," according to a viewpoint piece published online Sept. 18 in JAMA Dermatology.

Healther K. Hamilton, M.D., and Kenneth A. Arndt, M.D., from SkinCare Physicians in Chestnut Hill, Mass., discuss the optimal timing for initiation of appearance-enhancing procedures such as neuromodulators, fillers, and light or laser treatments.

The researchers note that regular treatment with a neurotoxin beginning in can prevent the development of etched-in lines. Furthermore, the more soft tissue fillers are used, the less often they are needed, as they induce new connective tissue that lasts longer than the injected filler. Intermittent exposure to energy sources induces changes in dermal , which have benefits that last after resolution of the effects of the laser or light treatment. Broadband light treatments have recently been suggested to alter to resemble that of younger skin, while and replacement of thermally damaged occurs in response to non-ablative 1550-nm fractional photothermolysis.

"Similar to our advocacy for the early use of other strategies to avoid or diminish the evolution of age-related changes such as sunscreens and topical retinoids, the initiation of conservative and thoughtful use of neuromodulators, fillers, and noninvasive energy-based treatments, alone or in combination, will keep patients looking young and their skin healthier," the authors write. "So there really is rarely a time that is too early."

One author disclosed financial ties to Solta Medical.

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